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News stories tagged with "outdoors"

Wild Center visitors Manny and Betsy, use watercolors, brushes and sponges to paint trees in the open studio art space at the "Moments" exhibit. Photo: Todd Moe
Wild Center visitors Manny and Betsy, use watercolors, brushes and sponges to paint trees in the open studio art space at the "Moments" exhibit. Photo: Todd Moe

Art in the park: when nature meets art at the Wild Center

Visitors to the Wild Center in Tupper Lake this summer are being encouraged to pick up a paintbrush or camera and capture a moment in the natural world. It's part of a multimedia exhibit that includes videos, photographs, original art by renowned watercolorist Allen Blagden and an interactive studio space for creating new art.

Todd Moe visits the new "Moments" exhibit at Natural History Museum of the Adirondacks, and talks with curator Caroline Welsh about using art to better understand nature and the environment.  Go to full article
Allen Blagden traveled to the Wild Center to paint the resident porcupine Stickley especially for the "Moments" exhibit.  Photo: Wild Center
Allen Blagden traveled to the Wild Center to paint the resident porcupine Stickley especially for the "Moments" exhibit. Photo: Wild Center

Watercolorist Allen Blagden inspires "Moments" exhibit in Tupper Lake

The art of one of the nation's best watercolorists is on display at the Wild Center in Tupper Lake. It's part of the inspiration for the "Moments, Reimagining Nature through Art" exhibit. The interactive display, that's part multi-media, part art show, part hands-on art project, encourages visitors to engage with nature through art.  Go to full article
Forest Ranger Captain John Streiff during a press conference announcing discovery of McKay's body.  (Photo:  Chris Knight, Adirondack Daily Enterprise, used with permission)
Forest Ranger Captain John Streiff during a press conference announcing discovery of McKay's body. (Photo: Chris Knight, Adirondack Daily Enterprise, used with permission)

Missing Australian found near Ray Brook, took own life

An intensive, nearly two-week search in the Adirondacks for a missing Australian soldier ended Wednesday when a state forest ranger found Paul McKay's body on Scarface Mountain near Ray Brook.

An autopsy released Thursday found McKay committed suicide by hypothermia.

The 31-year-old Australian Army captain was a veteran of the war in Afghanistan and suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder.

While the search for McKay is over, as Chris Knight reports, there are still many unanswered surrounding his disappearance.  Go to full article
"Snow Snake" by Utica artist Sybil Johnson.
"Snow Snake" by Utica artist Sybil Johnson.

How artists view winter in Old Forge

A new art exhibition at View in Old Forge offers an artistic look at winter. "Winter Air" opens Saturday. Exhibitions manager Cory Card says the juried show of 118 works by 58 regional, national and international artists conveys the distinct sensations of walking outside on a cold winter day. The new exhibit is complemented by the work of three other featured artists.

Todd Moe spoke with Cory Card about winter, art and the new exhibitions.  Go to full article

Book review: "Peak Experiences"

The mountains of the northeast attract hikers to their rocky summits. What happens, though, when something goes wrong? Carol Stone White collected over 50 essays in her new book, Peak Experiences - Danger, Death, and Daring in the Mountains of the Northeast. Betsy Kepes as this review.  Go to full article
<i>Maple tapping in the early spring</i>, butternut, Tom Cote. Photo:  Todd Moe
Maple tapping in the early spring, butternut, Tom Cote. Photo: Todd Moe

Artists who look to the forest for ideas, inspiration

Considered America's oldest working woodlands, the Northern Forest -- stretching from the Tug Hill through the Adirondacks to the coast of Maine -- is also home to a remarkable range of traditional artists. This month, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, opened a new exhibit that features art from among the trees.

TAUNY executive director Jill Breit says the concept behind Artists of the Forest is to showcase how artists are using the resources that are growing around them in the woods. The pieces featured in the show come from northern New York, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine.  Go to full article
A Common Pochard, a rare European duck, found among other ducks on Lake Champlain earlier this month.  Photo: Larry Master
A Common Pochard, a rare European duck, found among other ducks on Lake Champlain earlier this month. Photo: Larry Master

A record season for counting birds in Saranac Lake

Record numbers of bird species were counted recently during the Christmas Bird Count in the Saranac Lake area. Larry Master, longtime birder and wildlife photographer, says the Saranac Lake count broke a 47-year-old record for the number of bird species seen and the number of birders counting in the field. Fifty species were seen by 46 birders in the field, also a record for Saranac Lake.

Larry Master has been counting birds all his life. He took over compiling the Saranac Lake results in 1974. He says there was exciting birding news in the first week of the new year when a Common Pochard, a European duck, was sighted among several other very rare ducks, like the Tufted Duck and Barrow's Goldeneye, that gather near the Champlain Bridge at Crown Point.  Go to full article
Celia Evans, lower right, teaches Russian students some of her favorite songs. Photo: Celia Evans
Celia Evans, lower right, teaches Russian students some of her favorite songs. Photo: Celia Evans

Teaching and learning in Siberia

This fall, an ecology professor at Paul Smiths College traveled thousands of miles to learn about a new culture, and share a bit about life in the Adirondacks. Celia Evans was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to teach and conduct research in Siberia. She, and her two daughters, spent three months in Russia's Altai Republic studying primary school students' relationships to their environment, community and culture.

Evans, who also shared her love of folk music with her Russian hosts, told Todd Moe that she also wanted to find out how students in Siberia are learning about their natural world compared with students in the North Country.  Go to full article
Student Conservation Association president  Dale Penny.  He's one of the guest speakers Saturday at the Paul Smiths College VIC.   Photo: SCA
Student Conservation Association president Dale Penny. He's one of the guest speakers Saturday at the Paul Smiths College VIC. Photo: SCA

Green groups seek better communication, collaboration

Leaders from the region's environmental and conservation groups will gather at the Paul Smiths College VIC on Saturday to talk about improving communication, collaborations and the next generation of stewardship of the Adirondacks.

The nonprofit organization Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve is sponsoring the workshop at the Paul Smith's College VIC. Todd Moe talks with one of the keynote speakers at the workshop - Dale Penny, president of the Student Conservation Association.  Go to full article
Scott Weidensaul  (photo: Amiran White)
Scott Weidensaul (photo: Amiran White)

A life and career of watching birds

Ornithology, the study of birds, is entering a new "golden age" with tens of millions of participants, according to award-winning nature writer and bird expert Scott Weidensaul.

He's the featured speaker at the 9th Annual Great Adirondack Birding Celebration at the Paul Smiths College VIC on Saturday night. Weidensaul lives in Pennsylvania and has written more than two dozen books on natural history.

Todd Moe spoke with him about about how bird watching grew out of a "gentlemen's hobby" in the 18th century to become a professional and popular pastime.  Go to full article

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