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News stories tagged with "owl"

The "Phantom of the North", photo by Brian Sullivan
The "Phantom of the North", photo by Brian Sullivan

Great Gray Owl Glides Into NNY

The Great Gray Owl usually lives deep in the boreal forests of Canada. It's the official bird of the province of Manitoba. But due to scarce food and severe weather, thousands of the raptors have drifted south this year. They've invaded Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan, even southern Ontario and Quebec. But a Great Gray hadn't been spotted in New York State since 1996, according to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Until last Wednesday, that is, when ornithologist Gerry Smith spotted one in the farm fields between Clayton and Cape Vincent in Jefferson County. It so happened that David Sommerstein was there too and has the story.  Go to full article

Owl Invasion Affords Close-Up Observation

Great Gray Owl invasions, also called "irruptions", happen about once every ten years. But this one is the largest on record. Brian Sullivan is the project leader of the website, ebird.org, at the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology. Birders have posted Great Gray sightings from Minnesota to Montreal. Sullivan says it was only a matter of time until one was spotted in New York. Great Grays are one of the largest owls in North America, and they have a mysterious air about them. They're also known as the "Great Gray Ghost" and the "Phantom of the North". Sullivan told David Sommerstein despite those monikers, they're active during the day as well as night.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: The Barred Owl

Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley discuss the commonest northern forest member of the owl family. Curt's impersonation of this night hunter's call is hair-raising, and should be practiced, like a beginning bagpiper, far from other ears.  Go to full article

Rare Owl Draws Birdwatchers from Afar to Adirondacks

Bird watchers have been gathering in the Adirondacks in recent days, hoping to catch a glimpse of a rare "hawk-owl". The bird usually stays close to home in remote parts of northern Quebec or Labrador. Local experts say out of state bird watchers are traveling from as far away as New Jersey and Kentucky. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

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