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News stories tagged with "pagan"

Hearth Moon Rising is an ordained priestess in the Dianic tradition and in the Fellowship of Isis.  She lives in Keene Valley.  Photo: Hearth Moon Rising
Hearth Moon Rising is an ordained priestess in the Dianic tradition and in the Fellowship of Isis. She lives in Keene Valley. Photo: Hearth Moon Rising

Books: Invoking Animal Magic

Hearth Moon Rising is an Adirondack psychotherapist who is passionate about nature, the environment, animals and her own pagan spirituality. For more than 20 years she has taught magic and helped others integrate their experience of the natural world into their spiritual practice.

She's the author of a new book, Invoking Animal Magic, and has spent this summer talking about the mythology and folklore of animals and healing to audiences in Keene Valley and Saranac Lake. Hearth is also a licensed New York State Outdoor Guide, and enjoys hiking, running, snowshoeing, skiing and mountain biking.

Hearth Moon Rising spoke with Todd Moe about the book and her spiritual connection to the natural world.  Go to full article
A Winter Solstice symbol
A Winter Solstice symbol

Celebrating the winter solstice

If the early evening gloom is getting to you, take comfort that the days are about to start getting longer. The winter solstice began at 12:30 this morning, marking the shortest day of the year and the start of winter.

Most of the customs, symbols, and rituals associated with Christmas -- holly, mistletoe and pine boughs -- actually are linked to Winter Solstice celebrations of ancient Pagan cultures. Winter Solstice has been celebrated in many cultures for thousands of years.

A Solstice family celebration will be held tonight (7 pm) at St. Lawrence University's Herring-Cole Hall with music, merriment, science and revelry.

A few years ago, a group gathered at St. Lawrence to celebrate the Solstice with songs, poems and candles.  Go to full article

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