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News stories tagged with "park-agency"

The confluence of the Hudson River, at right, and the Cedar River, bottom, is on the 18,300-acre Essex Chain of Lakes tract in the towns of Minerva and Newcomb. Photo: Carl Heilman II, courtesy of the Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy
The confluence of the Hudson River, at right, and the Cedar River, bottom, is on the 18,300-acre Essex Chain of Lakes tract in the towns of Minerva and Newcomb. Photo: Carl Heilman II, courtesy of the Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy

Historic Finch lands decision near in Adirondacks

The Adirondack Park Agency has begun final deliberations into the future of the Finch Pruyn timberlands.

Roughly 40.000 acres in the central Adirondacks are slated to be classified tomorrow, with state officials pushing for creation of a big new wilderness area along the upper Hudson River. Also in the works is a new motor-free paddling area on the Essex Chain of Lakes.

At the start of yesterday's session, APA executive director Terry Martino called the conservation effort "historic." She praised the Adirondack Nature Conservancy, which engineered the massive deal, first unveiled in 2007.

Some aspects of the Finch classification plan remain controversial, including a plan to build a snowmobile bridge over the wild Cedar River. But the big story this week may be how amicable this process has been, with far less drama and bitterness than in previous years.  Go to full article
A clear cut near Speculator managed by Lyme Timber.  Sometimes a woodlot that looks heavily logged is being managed well, while a parcel with lots of trees can be made of "junk" timber. Photo used by permission
A clear cut near Speculator managed by Lyme Timber. Sometimes a woodlot that looks heavily logged is being managed well, while a parcel with lots of trees can be made of "junk" timber. Photo used by permission

A million acres of Adk timberland becoming "junk"?

In recent weeks, the Adirondack Park has become embroiled in a new debate over clearcut logging.

But a growing coalition of environmentalists, industry leaders, government officials and academics agree on one thing.

More than a million acres of the Park's privately-owned timber land is deteriorating -- turning into what some critics describe as "junk" forest.

That trend threatens the long-term environmental health of the Adirondacks, as well as the health of the North Country's logging industry.  Go to full article
South Branch Camp (Photo:  Phil Royce)
South Branch Camp (Photo: Phil Royce)

APA: hunting camps can stay

The Adirondack Park Agency voted on Friday to allow 220 traditional hunting clubs to keep their cabins on the former Champion timber lands in the northern and western Adirondacks.

That reverses a decade-old decision struck by state officials that would have evicted the clubs, some of them dating back generations.

As Brian Mann reports, the fate of the clubs has been a flashpoint in the Park for years.  Go to full article
Park Agency chairman Curt Stiles
Park Agency chairman Curt Stiles

Park Agency, local government leaders trade accusations

A new firestorm has erupted between the Adirondack Park Agency and some local government leaders in the North Country.

The Park's Local Government Review Board issued a report last week, claiming that the APA is "under the influence and in need of detoxification."

Park Agency chairman Curt Stiles responded with a letter questioning the Review Board's honesty and its legitimacy. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
Joe Martens, OSI (Source:  APA
Joe Martens, OSI (Source: APA

OSI's Joe Martens: "We've got to start figuring out the (Adirondack Park) differently"

The Open Space Institute has helped to engineer some of the most important land conservation deals in the Adirondack Park over the last decade.

OSI financed the Tahawus purchase, which protected parts of the southern High Peaks. The group also helped fund the massive Finch, Pruyn deal worth more than $110 million.

But OSI executive director Joe Martens, who also heads the Olympic Regional Development Authority board, says the fiscal crisis in Albany is changing the rules for how the Park should be managed. Martens spoke in depth with NCPR's Adirondack bureau chief, Brian Mann.  Go to full article

APA reviews plan to tear down popular Adirondack fire towers

The Adirondack Park Agency meets today in Ray Brook and the agenda includes a discussion of the controversial plan to remove two popular fire towers. The APA will also review a the Tall Timbers development project in North Creek. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article
The existing bridge on Great Sacandaga (Source:  NYSDOT
The existing bridge on Great Sacandaga (Source: NYSDOT

Great Sacandaga: APA approves new Batchelerville bridge design

A lot of attention this winter has focused on the bridge crisis in the Champlain Valley. But locals in the southern Adirondacks are also worried about the rapid deterioration of the span across the Great Sacandaga Reservoir. State officials say construction of a new bridge is expected to get underway this summer. At a meeting last week, the Adirondack Park Agency approved a new design for the project expected to shave roughly $11 million off its cost. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article
APA chairman Curt Stiles (Source:  APA)
APA chairman Curt Stiles (Source: APA)

New APA regs: Good government or power grab?

Today in Ray Brook the Adirondack Park Agency begins a series of public hearings on new regulations for boathouses in the Park. This latest round of rulemaking comes at a time when the APA has issued a series of new regulations affecting private land and development. The rules govern everything from shoreline homes to hunting camps. Supporters say the APA is doing its job, fleshing out the guidelines that protect water quality and conserve open space. But critics say state officials are steadily expanding their power over privately-owned land without authority from the legislature. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
APA chairman Curt Stiles. APA photo
APA chairman Curt Stiles. APA photo

Adk snowmobile trail limit set at 848 miles

The Adirondack Park Agency has set a new limit on snowmobile trails that will affect "wild forest" land in the Park. The 848-mile ceiling, approved on Friday, drew fierce criticism from snowmobile riders. The reaction among pro-environment groups was more mixed, with some arguing that the limit leaves too much wiggle room. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article
APA chairman Ross Whaley
APA chairman Ross Whaley

APA Chairman Whaley resigns

Adirondack Park Agency chairman Ross Whaley announced Thursday that he's stepping down after four years on the job. His departure continues a major shake-up of North Country environmental officials that began with the election of Governor Eliot Spitzer. As Brian Mann reports, Whaley's replacement is expected to be named soon.  Go to full article

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