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News stories tagged with "paul-smith-s"

Instructors Brett McLeod and Bob Brhel teach the students how to saw down a tree. Photo: David Sommerstein
Instructors Brett McLeod and Bob Brhel teach the students how to saw down a tree. Photo: David Sommerstein

Ax throw, log climb at Adirondack lumberjack class

PAUL SMITHS, N.Y. (AP) Ax throwing is encouraged in lumberjack class.

The annual Adirondack Woodsmen's School is being held this summer amid the tall pines and placid waters of Paul Smith's College in New York. Despite the course's name, there are no bushy beards and no flannel shirts.  Go to full article
Ice is thinner and less common on Lake Champlain since the 1970s. (Photo: Brian Mann)
Ice is thinner and less common on Lake Champlain since the 1970s. (Photo: Brian Mann)

Champlain study shows evidence of warming

As 2010 draws to a close, we're revisiting important environmental stories of the year. Climate change tops the list, as scientists struggle to understand how global changes will impact local regions.

This morning, Brian Mann talks with Paul Smith's scientist and researcher Curt Stager. His work often takes him far afield, to sample lake bottoms in Africa and Russia for evidence of ecological changes over geological time.
This year he focussed closer to home, on the impact of climate change in the Champlain Valley. Stager co-authored the study with Adirondack-based journalist Mary Thill. The research was funded by the Adirondack Nature Conservancy in an effort to find out how global warming might affect one relatively small region.

The study shows that since the 1970s, temperatures have already risen in the Champlain Valley by roughly two degrees Fahrenheit. Increased precipitation has also raised the lake level by an average of a foot. Warming is expected to continue over the next century.

Stager told Brian Mann that scientists are struggling to understand the local impacts of climate change.  Go to full article
A lake view at White Pine Camp.
A lake view at White Pine Camp.

Fodor's gives White Pine Camp a gold star

An Adirondack Great Camp has won high praise from Fodor's Travel. The travel guidebook publisher has named White Pine Camp, near Paul Smith's, as one of the top 10 "Best Sense of Place" destinations in the U.S. Fodor's calls White Pine Camp, "Rustic and elegant". Built in 1908, it hosted celebrities and dignitaries, including President Calvin Coolidge and his wife, in the 1920's. Dick and Mary George are co-owners and caretakers of the camp. Todd Moe spoke with Dick George about White Pine Camp's history and authentic feel.  Go to full article

Enviro-Trek: Canoeing from Paul Smiths to NYC

Martha Foley talks with a member of the Paul Smith's College Enviro-Trek team. Last summer, they paddled canoes all the way from Paul Smith's to New York City--much of the trip along the Hudson River. Becky Sutter was coordinator of educational programs for the trip.  Go to full article

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