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News stories tagged with "pcb"

"Contaminated Cove" Update

After a 14-year impasse, the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe will allow General Motors on to tribal land to clean up an inlet on the St. Lawrence River. Turtle Cove is contaminated with PCBs, a cancer-causing chemical. The EPA ordered the work to be done in 1990. But tribal officials wouldn't allow it because General Motors giant toxic landfill is right next to the cove and they feared the water would get re-contaminated. Different visions of what "clean" means have stalled clean-up of the GM landfill Superfund site near Massena. Listen again to David Sommerstein's report from 2001 on how GM, the EPA and the Mohawks see the PCB problem.  Go to full article

Fort Edward: PCB Search Moves Downtown

The search for PCBs in the Hudson River valley will soon move to downtown Fort Edward. According to the Glens Falls Post-Star, state environmental officials plan to begin testing soil and groundwater later this month. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

More Clean-up Work at Sealand

A toxic waste dump in St. Lawrence County will get the next stage of a clean-up this week. Federal contractors will install a filter to clean up contaminated groundwater at the Sealand Restoration landfill in the town of Lisbon. But as David Sommerstein reports, neighbors see the work as too little, too late.  Go to full article
GM's PCB landfill from the Akwesasne Mohawk reservation
GM's PCB landfill from the Akwesasne Mohawk reservation

New Work at GM's PCB Landfill

Twenty years ago, the federal government declared General Motors toxic waste dump by the St. Lawrence River a Superfund site. That designation made it a high priority for cleanup. But a stand-off between the company and the nearby St. Regis Mohawk Tribe has left small amounts of PCBs still seeping into the river. General Motors wants to contain and monitor the chemicals forever. The tribe wants GM to truck them away. This week, General Motors is digging up contaminated soil to convince the tribe that their solution works. As David Sommerstein reports, the sides are still far from agreement.  Go to full article

Study: PCBs Linked to Low Birth Weight Babies

A study by a State University researcher has found that there is a
correlation between mothers living near PCB contaminated sites in New York and low birth weight babies. Karen DeWitt reports.  Go to full article

Big Clean-Up Of River PCBs

There's a plan in place to clean up a PCB-contaminated river. It could be one of the most comprehensive, and most expensive, river cleanups ever done in North America. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Patty Murray has more.  Go to full article

Poll: Toxic Chemicals Big Issue With Voters

A poll released Thursday finds a majority of voters are very concerned about the most dangerous toxic chemicals, like mercury, dioxin, and PCBs. Environmentalists see the poll as a mandate for elected officials to pass laws removing the chemicals from air and water. David Sommerstein has more.  Go to full article

Water Watchers: Canton Students Monitor Grasse River

This month marks the 30th anniversary of Clean Water Act, a milestone in our nation's efforts to protect water resources. To honor the 30-year anniversary of that legislation, communities in every state celebrated Nation Water Monitoring Day last week. It was an opportunity for everyone to learn how to help protect local waterways by becoming citizen monitors. Todd Moe tagged along as Canton High School students scrutinized the physical, chemical and biological aspects of a river in their backyard  Go to full article

Science Students Head to Local Streams for Hands-on Learning

Martha Foley talks with Marilyn Mayer, a local biologist, who's spearheading a partnership between St. Lawrence University and local science classrooms.  Go to full article

Clean Water Act Marks 30th Anniversary

On the 30th anniversary of the Federal Clean Water Act, a coalition of environmental groups say the Hudson River still needs more work, before it can be thoroughly cleaned up. Karen Dewitt reports.  Go to full article

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