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News stories tagged with "philadelphia"

The Jefferson County Sheriff's office reports the arrest of 22-year-old Caleb Larson in the incident. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/28111950@N00/9502706219/">dfirecop</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
The Jefferson County Sheriff's office reports the arrest of 22-year-old Caleb Larson in the incident. Photo: dfirecop, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Fort Drum soldier charged with "making a terroristic threat"

Police have arrested a Fort Drum soldier for allegedly threatening to shoot up a Jefferson County school. According to a press release from the Jefferson County Sheriff, investigators believe 22-year-old Caleb Larson made the remark to a school parent this past Saturday.  Go to full article
Dairy farmer Mike Kiechle of Philadelphia, NY, spreads manure from his tractor. He's the kind of small farmer the new rules are trying to target, but he says he doubts he'll grow his herd bigger. Photo: David Sommerstein
Dairy farmer Mike Kiechle of Philadelphia, NY, spreads manure from his tractor. He's the kind of small farmer the new rules are trying to target, but he says he doubts he'll grow his herd bigger. Photo: David Sommerstein

Will the Greek yogurt boom help dairy farmers?

Last week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced New York will be one of four states in a test program to include Greek yogurt in school lunches.

State officials praised the news - as a new way to induce kids to eat their protein, and as a way to continue to fuel the Greek yogurt boom for New York dairy farmers.

New York has invested millions of dollars in tax breaks into new and expanding yogurt plants. Governor Andrew Cuomo eased environmental rules to encourage 200 cow dairy farms to become 300 cow dairy farms and make more milk.

Experts say New York farmers will have to boost milk production by 15%, or 2 billion pounds each year, to keep up with demand.

So does New York have a milk shortage? And are farmers stepping up it fill it?
David Sommerstein reports the answers lie in cream cheese, Old McDonald, and something called the Chobani Paradox.  Go to full article
Frank Forney, Philadelphia, cutting wood with his nephew on Route 11 in Antwerp. Photo: David Sommerstein
Frank Forney, Philadelphia, cutting wood with his nephew on Route 11 in Antwerp. Photo: David Sommerstein

Listen: The man who painted one of the St. Lawrence's tallest bridges

You never know who you're going to meet by the side of the road in the North Country.

David Sommerstein stopped to chat with a guy sawing firewood, and it turns out he painted one of the tallest bridges over the St. Lawrence River.

David Talked with Philadelphia's Frank Forney about wood cutting, suspension bridges, and why they're always green.  Go to full article
A tale of two dairy farmers. Mike Kiechle, Philadelphia, says expanding his herd is too much of a risk. Photo: David Sommerstein
A tale of two dairy farmers. Mike Kiechle, Philadelphia, says expanding his herd is too much of a risk. Photo: David Sommerstein

Will the Greek yogurt boom help dairy farmers?

You might have been surprised last summer to hear politicians walking around and talking about--yogurt. Governor Andrew Cuomo held a Yogurt Summit at the Capitol in Albany, where he said the explosion of the Greek yogurt industry in New York is a once-in-a-generation moment. "This is one of the best private sector market opportunities that Upstate New York has had in 30, 40 years," procliamed Cuomo. "I don't know when we get another one. I really, really don't. And that entrepreneurial spirit is when you see an opportunity, grab it."

New York has invested millions of dollars in tax breaks into new and expanding yogurt plants. Cuomo wants to ease environmental rules to encourage 200 cow dairy farms to become 300 cow dairy farms and make more milk.

Experts say New York farmers will have to boost milk production by 15 percent, or two billion pounds each year, to keep up with demand.

So does New York have a milk shortage? And are farmers stepping up it fill it?

The answers lie in cream cheese, Old McDonald, and something called the Chobani Paradox.  Go to full article
It's pretty typical for us to drop way off in June of a school year and then get ready to receive 150, 200, 250 in September.

School district near Fort Drum sees rapid expansion

The Indian River Central School District in Jefferson County is growing, fast. As the school year began this fall, the district received 90 new students in nine school days. Nearly 70 percent of the district's students come from military families, so numbers fluctuate with deployments and as housing is built on Fort Drum and in surrounding areas. Reporter Joanna Richards spoke with Assistant Superintendent Mary Anne Dobmeier about population trends at Indian River, and how the district is absorbing so many new students after the school year has begun.  Go to full article

Heard Up North: Running out of gas (in good company)

Our next story takes place on a dark, Halloween night. David Sommerstein was coming back from an assignment at Fort Drum. Everything was going great until the village of Philadelphia, when David's car just coasted to a stop. Fortunately, he ran out of gas in front of a house where the gas can was getting plenty of use. Coincidence and the kindness of strangers for today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article

Roy Kiechle is North Country Public Radio

Roy Kiechle of Philadelphia remembers raiding the cheese cellar in the family factory.  Go to full article

Mark Swanson is North Country Public Radio

Mark Swanson from Philadelphia explains how to put a milking machine on a cow.  Go to full article
A volunteer plants onions in Gouverneur's community garden last spring
A volunteer plants onions in Gouverneur's community garden last spring

Growing Gardens in Jefferson County

Land has been cleared for a new community garden in the North Country village of Philadelphia. Organizers say the garden, near Fort Drum, will be a reliable source of fresh vegetables for area families and food pantries, and a powerful means to bring people together. Todd Moe talks with Odette Butler, of Cornell Cooperative Extension in Jefferson County. For more information about community gardens, call 315-788-8450  Go to full article

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