Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "photography"

Gail and Bob Simmons are among the year-round and seasonal Wanakenans profiled in Kristin Rehder's photo exhibition, <i>The Way to Wanakena</i>, at the Ranger School through September 30th.
Gail and Bob Simmons are among the year-round and seasonal Wanakenans profiled in Kristin Rehder's photo exhibition, The Way to Wanakena, at the Ranger School through September 30th.

Photographer captures Wanakena's community spirit

Using images and text, a new photography exhibit explores the meaning of community and small town life in the northern Adirondacks. The Way to Wanakena is the thesis project of seasonal resident Kristin Rehder, a graduate student at Skidmore College. Her photos are on display at the Ranger School through September 30th.

Rehder told Todd Moe that she's a writer by profession who is also a "passionate photographer" who uses the camera to help her "learn something about the world." Her exhibit is in the tradition of social-activist photography. Rehder says she fell in love with Wanakena during her first visit eleven years ago.  Go to full article
Jane Lammer's <i>Perennial Bliss</i> exhibit continues at First Crush Bistro in Potsdam this month.
Jane Lammer's Perennial Bliss exhibit continues at First Crush Bistro in Potsdam this month.

Garden photos offer a mid-winter break

A new photo exhibit in Potsdam connects art, music, gardens and friendship. Photographer Jane Lammers spent time last spring, summer and early fall in the perennial gardens of three North Country friends.

She also assembled a playlist of music to accompany her exhibit, Perennial Bliss. It includes music by Jean-Pierre Rampal, Yo-Yo Ma and James Galway. The eight photos in the exhibit follow the seasonal flow in flower gardens.

Todd Moe spoke with Jane Lammers about gardens, photography and music. Her show is up through the end of the month at First Crush Bistro in Potsdam.  Go to full article
Jane Subramanian and Virginia Rose Cayey, with campus icon &quot;Minnie,&quot; a statue of the Roman goddess <em>Minerva</em>. Their new book traces nearly 200 years of history at SUNY Potsdam.
Jane Subramanian and Virginia Rose Cayey, with campus icon "Minnie," a statue of the Roman goddess Minerva. Their new book traces nearly 200 years of history at SUNY Potsdam.

New book highlights SUNY's oldest campus

A new book tells the history of SUNY Potsdam through photographs. Potsdam is the oldest campus in the state university system and the new Arcadia Publishing book includes more than 200 vintage images. The book traces the school's history from its founding in 1816; its teacher training traditions, the Crane School of Music, School of Arts and Sciences, athletics and other activities. Todd Moe talks with the two local authors, Jane Subramanian and Virginia Rose Cayey, about their memories as students at SUNY Potsdam and some of the joys and challenges of sifting through hundreds of historic photos and documents.  Go to full article
Nancie Battaglia with her photograph of <em>One Square Mile of Hope</em>.
Nancie Battaglia with her photograph of One Square Mile of Hope.

Preview: Adirondack View Finders in Old Forge

Todd Moe talks with Linda Weal, curator of the newest exhibit at View in Old Forge. The show, Adirondack View Finders, is on display through early March and includes dozens of photographs from four of the most celebrated photographers in the Adirondacks.  Go to full article

Claxton-Hepburn Medical Center's history celebrated in new book

A new book profiles the early history, founders, and staff of St. Lawrence County's first hospital, Claxton-Hepburn Medical Center in Ogdensburg. It opened in 1885, and over the years, the hospital has housed a nursing school and was the first to bring many new health services to the region, including an artificial kidney machine in the late 1960's.

Todd Moe talks with Cyndy Clusen and Kelsey Redpath, creators of the latest Arcadia photo book that celebrates Claxton-Hepburn's past. They'll lead a discussion about the hospital and the new book at the Brewer Bookstore in Canton this Saturday afternoon at 1 pm.  Go to full article
Tucked into the back of the book is a stereoviewer and instructions for viewing the photos in 3-D.
Tucked into the back of the book is a stereoviewer and instructions for viewing the photos in 3-D.

Thousand Islands history in 3-D

A new book offers a slightly different view of life in the Thousand Islands region of the St. Lawrence River. What started as a hobby collecting old photographs for Tom French has grown into a fascination with historic stereographs--antique 3-D photographs--and a passion for preserving Thousand Islands history. French was raised on Thousand Island Park. He teaches English in Massena and splits his time between the St. Lawrence River and his home in Potsdam.

The amateur historian has compiled and edited a book of old stereographs of the region. River Views: A History of the Thousand Islands in 3-D, includes more than 100 sepia-toned stereograph cards that illustrate the history of the Thousand Islands. But he told Todd Moe that it was also the stories behind the old photos that intrigued him.  Go to full article
A photograph from the exhibit.
A photograph from the exhibit.

Noonball, up close and on film

You may not see art in a bunch of sweaty guys playing pickup basketball, but Peter Nelson did. Nelson is a photography professor at St. Lawrence University. He recently moved to the North Country and started playing "noonball", lunchtime basketball that's become a tradition in college and community gymnasiums nationwide.

As a way to get to know his new community better, Nelson staged photographed portraits of the players. The results are on display in a new exhibit called "Two Point Perspective" at SLU's Brush Art Gallery. Nelson will give a talk at a gallery reception tonight at 7:30. David Sommerstein produced this audio montage of the artist and his subjects talking about noonball meeting art.  Go to full article
2011 in ice on the medieval castle wall
2011 in ice on the medieval castle wall

Carving a castle of ice in Saranac Lake

For more than a century, a palace built of ice has been the central focus of the Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. Local volunteers design and build the structure out of ice blocks based on the Winter Carnival theme. This year, it's "Medieval Times", and photographer Mark Kurtz used his camera to profile the team of sculptors who filled the castle with frozen furnishings.  Go to full article
Laura Rice with Hobart Roberts' cameras at the Adirondack Museum.
Laura Rice with Hobart Roberts' cameras at the Adirondack Museum.

Adirondack Attic: vintage wildlife photos

We continue our series, the Adirondack Attic, with Andy Flynn. You may know Andy from his series of "Adirondack Attic" books on local history. He uses the objects people make, use and leave behind to tell stories about the life and times of the region. NCPR is collaborating with Andy and his sources at the Adirondack Museum and other historical associations and museums in the region to bring these stories to air. Today, we hear the story of wildlife photographer Hobart Roberts.  Go to full article
A soldier from A Co., 1st of the 187th Infantry, on a hilltop overlooking a search site June 7, 2010.
A soldier from A Co., 1st of the 187th Infantry, on a hilltop overlooking a search site June 7, 2010.

An audio postcard from the mountains of Afghanistan

Yesterday President Obama fired his top commander in Afghanistan, General Stanley McChrystal, in the wake of comments he made in Rolling Stone magazine. Pundits applauded McChrystal's replacement, General David Petraeus. But the dismissal has renewed doubts over the military's ability to win the war. Violence is at its highest since 2001. Corruption and poppy production remain serious obstacles.

With thousands of Fort Drum soldiers already in or soon going to Afghanistan, we're examining the war effort from various points of view. Several years ago, photojournalist and ex-soldier Bill Putnam sent us audio diaries from Iraq. Now, Putnam is in the mountains of Afghanistan near the border with Pakistan. He's embedded with a unit out of Texas. Today he sends us the first in a series of audio journals.  Go to full article

« first  « previous 10  11-30 of 48  next 10 »  last »