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News stories tagged with "physics"

People have wondered how colors work for a long time, as shown by <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Boutet_1708_color_circles.jpg">Claude Boutet's 7-color and 12-color color circles</a>, from a publication in 1708.
People have wondered how colors work for a long time, as shown by Claude Boutet's 7-color and 12-color color circles, from a publication in 1708.

Natural Selections: Seeing Colors

The notion that all colors mixed together make white can be disputed by any child who has made a stew of his paint set, but that is what a prism shows us. Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley talk about colors, and how they differ to different eyes.  Go to full article
Kristeen Colby under a blue sky near Gabriels. Archive Photo of the Day: Jason Colby, Saranac Lake, NY.
Kristeen Colby under a blue sky near Gabriels. Archive Photo of the Day: Jason Colby, Saranac Lake, NY.

Natural Selections: Why is the sky blue?, take 2

Dr. Curt Stager tries once again to answer the classic child's question. It is a poser that was worthy of Einstein's time, who eventually came up with the best answer. But it's complicated. And when the sky isn't blue, why not? What's up with that? Martha Foley wants to know.  Go to full article
Atmospheric carbon-14 spike caused by nuclear testing.
Atmospheric carbon-14 spike caused by nuclear testing.

Natural Selections: Fallout and carbon dating

Curt Stager and Martha Foley discuss radiocarbon dating. Fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons has distorted the background levels of the radioactive isotope carbon-14, used by archaeologists to date organic materials. But it has an upside, providing a new scale by which to date more recent events, helping researchers track cell turnover in different parts of the body and in testing the age of everything from vintage wine to elephant ivory.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Atom supply

In Song of Myself, Whitman says, "For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you." Given that the world atom supply is finite, more or less, Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager explore the notion that all of us are made up of some atoms that were found in William Shakepeare, the dinosaurs, and each other.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Why is the sky blue?

Martha Foley poses the classic child's question. According to Dr. Curt Stager, the answer lies in the composition of the atmosphere, and in the refractive qualities of different wavelengths of light.  Go to full article
Moon and planets, 9 pm
Moon and planets, 9 pm

Solstice, planets and more in the night sky

The summer solstice isn't until next Monday, but the earliest sunrise of the year was this morning, and the latest sunset isn't until later this month. St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue shared these fun facts, and talked about how the crescent moon will be a good guide to Venus, Mars, Saturn and the star, Spica, over the next few days when she visited our studios this morning.
(Ooops! Aileen says it's a waning crescent Moon near Jupiter on July 3 and 4...not a gibbous Moon.)  Go to full article

What's up in the February night sky

If you can brave cold, crisp weather, there are plenty of treasures for stargazers in the February night sky -- Mars, Jupiter and the constellation Orion. Todd Moe talks with St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue about what's up in the night sky these days.  Go to full article
Venus in the southeast morning sky. (Graphic image from Space.com)
Venus in the southeast morning sky. (Graphic image from Space.com)

Autumn sky: less daylight, more planets visible

St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue and Martha Foley talk about the autumn sky - from Venus in the morning to the waning crescent moon.  Go to full article

Autumn's night sky: dazzling star clusters

St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue has the low-down on what's up in the night sky. She spoke with Martha Foley.  Go to full article

Autumn Night Sky: Venus and Mars are the Star Attractions

Martha Foley talks with St. Lawrence University Astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue about sky watching this month.  Go to full article

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