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News stories tagged with "place-names"

Heard up North: The Road with Two Names

We've been talking about place names in the north country. But what about when people try to change those names? Today's heard up north is a cautionary tale of sorts. Bobby Gordon is manager of Literacy Volunteers of St Lawrence County. Gregory Warner met her last year when he reported on a scrabble competition that Literacy Volunteers hosted. He called her back to talk about why her road in Slab City now has two names.  Go to full article
No, not <b>that</b> North Country...
No, not that North Country...

Heard up North: How the North Country got its name, Part I

How did the North Country get its name? Gregory Warner called up Neal Burdick, editor of Adirondac magazine. He had a theory...  Go to full article

Heard up North: Haws, We Gotch Ye

In their weekly series on North Country place names, Dale Hobson and Gregory Warner discuss a bogus origin for the name "Oswegatchie" as well as the truth... we also hear from Chris Angus, editor of "Oswegatchie: A North Country River".  Go to full article

Heard up North: Drowned Cities

The St Lawrence River Power Project forever changed the landscape of the North Country. The hydro power dams erected almost 50 years ago expanded the Seaway, flooding 100 square miles of land on both sides of the river. St Lawrence County leaders who now argue for cheap power to stay here in the North Country say the state should remember that sacrifice.

Most of the flooding was on the Canadian side; we'll hear about the '10 lost villages' in a moment. On the American side, parts of Waddington and Massena were flooded, and hundreds of farmhouses along the old Route 37 were moved. Dale Hobson was an eyewitness. He spoke with Gregory Warner.  Go to full article

Heard up North: Place Names "Negro Creek"

Dale Hobson and Gregory Warner discuss place names and their origin: Today, Negro Creek. And the "7 Categories" of Adirondack Place Names...  Go to full article

Heard up North: Slab City, Sodom, and Swastika

We've been running a series about place names in the North Country. It started out by accident - a feature on Saint Lawrence led to more calls about local place names and their origins. Yesterday on All Before Five, host Gregory Warner and our own resident poet and historian Dale Hobson sat down to talk about a few place names you asked us to investigate. Starting with Slab City, a small area in West Potsdam. Gregory called Joretta Creighton, a 3rd generation Slab City resident who owns Bailey's Florists. She says the place got its name from the slab wood that was the refuse of the area's paper mills.  Go to full article

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