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News stories tagged with "plants"

Some are plants, some not so much. Blanket of brilliant green moss, mounds of reindeer lichens, and conifer saplings growing on smooth rock banks between Blue Ridge and Newcomb. Archive Photo of the Day: Ann Pilcher.
Some are plants, some not so much. Blanket of brilliant green moss, mounds of reindeer lichens, and conifer saplings growing on smooth rock banks between Blue Ridge and Newcomb. Archive Photo of the Day: Ann Pilcher.

Natural Selections: What is a plant?

Mushrooms grow out of the soil like plants, but are fungi. Lichens may look leafy, but they are symbiotic colonies of fungi and algae. Seaweed looks like a plant, but is an algae colony. And Indian Pipe looks like a fungi, but is a plant. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager discuss the ins and outs of botany.  Go to full article

USDA releases new gardening zone map

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has released the new version of its Plant Hardiness Zone Map. It's an update of a useful tool for gardeners. Clinton and Essex County Cornell Cooperative Extension Service Horticulturist Amy Ivy says it's a "great piece of the gardening puzzle" in the North Country, but not the whole story. She spoke with Todd Moe.  Go to full article
Margaret Roach
Margaret Roach

From the big city to a dirt road--and loving it!

Margaret Roach, former editorial director of Martha Stewart Living turned blogger, has done what some urbanites only dream about - traded a busy career for life in the country. Roach left New York City and the magazine design world a few years ago for a quieter life filled with two lifelong passions: gardening and writing. She'll give a talk at St. Eustace Church in Lake Placid on Saturday (2-4 pm), titled "Nonstop Plants: a Garden for 365 Days." The event is a fundraiser for the Lake Placid Community Beautification. You'll find tickets at The Bookstore Plus. She also sign copies of her latest book, And I Shall Have Some Peace There.

For more than twenty years Margaret Roach has been working on the gardens at her place in Columbia County, near the Berkshires. She spoke with Todd Moe about gardening and finding solitude.  Go to full article
(Photo: Wikipedia)
(Photo: Wikipedia)

Natural Selections: Poison Ivy

"Leaves of three, let it be." Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about poison ivy. They discuss whether it's really an ivy, why we call it "poison," and how humans and animals react differently to the plant.  Go to full article

A winter 'green thumb': propagating indoor plants

Horticulturist Amy Ivy has some tips for propagating indoor plants this month. It's an inexpensive way to increase your indoor garden and prep some seedlings, like geraniums, for spring transplanting outdoors. Amy told Todd Moe that indoor plant propagation is easy, but there are a few rules to follow.  Go to full article

In the garden: one old threat, one new one

A new threat to the onion family: leek moth. The moths are familiar to gardeners across the border in Ontario and Quebec, but were only reported in this country last summer, in Plattsburgh. In their weekly conversation, Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy tells Martha Foley what home gardeners should look for. Plus a reminder to dig up and safely dispose of "volunteer" potatoes...growing from the remnants of last year late blight-infected crop.  Go to full article

It's a good time to start over with houseplants

Horticulturist Amy Ivy says she spent time this past weekend propagating a whole new generation of houseplants. Geraniums, a goldfish plant, a jade tree -- all got a fresh start. Amy, with the Cornell Cooperative Extension Service, is a true green thumb. But according to what she told Martha Foley, starting new plants from old ones isn't only for the expert gardener.  Go to full article

House plants respond to longer days, too

Martha Foley and horticulturist Amy Ivy have tips for care and feeding of house plants as they start to wake up for spring.  Go to full article
Native plant expert Jane Desotelle inspects a plot of mullen, or "Quaker's Rouge", on Falls Island in Canton.
Native plant expert Jane Desotelle inspects a plot of mullen, or "Quaker's Rouge", on Falls Island in Canton.

Eating the North Country: wild food foraging

For nearly 30 years, Jane Desotelle has been collecting herbs in the Adirondacks for teas and sometimes an entire meal of found food. Desotelle owns "Underwood Herbs" and also runs a botanical sanctuary. She's a gardener, artist and plant expert. She recently led a plant walk for TAUNY on Falls Island in downtown Canton. Todd Moe tagged along to learn more about weeds that are good for you. Reminder: It's often illegal to pick wild plants on public lands, and always ask permission before venturing onto someone else's property.  Go to full article

Building an Ark for the World's Plants

You've heard about the ark Noah built to save the world's animals. Now comes news of another kind of ark - one designed to help save the world's plants. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Sandy Hausman has that story.  Go to full article

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