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News stories tagged with "power"

"Smart Grid" designed to prevent major blackouts

Remember that huge blackout in the summer of 2003? 45 million people in the Midwest and Northeast US, as well as 10 million in Canada, lost power. Government and utilities are spending billions of dollars on what's called a "Smart Grid," in part, so we don't have more large scale blackouts. But there's a lot more to the emerging system. Julie Grant has more.  Go to full article

National Grid responds to push for municipal power

More now on a developing story about 24 towns in the North Country hoping to band together and create a publicly owned electric company. State law allows a town or city to become its own power provider after parting with privately held utilities, like National Grid. Massena has done this.

But several towns can't join forces to form a communal electric company. This could soon change. The state Senate recently approved a bill clearing the way. The measure awaits passage by the Assembly and the Governor.

Legislative approval, if it comes, is only one hurdle for these towns. They also need to separate themselves from National Grid. Meaning the new, publicly owned power company would have to produce electricity and provide it via a network of their own transmission lines. Todd Moe has more.  Go to full article

Municipal power alliance clears legislative hurdle

Two-dozen towns in St. Lawrence and Franklin counties may soon be able to join forces and create a municipal electric company. This non-profit company could cut power bills by buying and distributing its own electricity, cutting out the utility middleman.

Right now, each town has the right to form its own electric company, similar to those in Massena, Lake Placid and Tupper Lake. But, it doesn't make sense for small, rural towns to go it alone. That's according to Bob Best. He's president of the Alliance for Municipal Power, or AMP. The group has worked for more than a decade to establish a municipal power company in rural St. Lawrence County.

He said that while each town could form its own electric company, state law doesn't allow towns to come together in a single municipal company. AMP has been asking state lawmakers to change that. The state Senate passed a bill clearing the way this week. It goes next to the Assembly, and if approved, on to the governor.

Municipal power companies have also faced stiff opposition from utilities, long legal battles to win control of the local transmission system, and penalties when they left the grid.
Best told Martha Foley this takeover, from National Grid, could be a friendly one, once the legislature and governor sign off.  Go to full article
TDI's cable will run under the water of Lake Champlain
TDI's cable will run under the water of Lake Champlain

Proposed Lake Champlain transmission line complicated by engineering, history

Last week, a Canadian company called Transmission Developers Incorporated unveiled a $3.8-billion plan to lay high-power electric transmission lines under Lake Champlain and the Hudson River. The project would be part of the new "smart" electrical grid, designed to open the floodgates to new sources of green and renewable energy. The company has begun meeting with state regulators, environmentalists and historic preservation groups. As Brian Mann reports, the transmission line will be one of the most complicated power-grid projects in the country.  Go to full article

Developer reveals details of underwater power corridor

State and federal officials will have to approve a new plan to run a high-voltage electricity transmission line 300 miles from Quebec to metro New York City through New York's Champlain Valley - mostly underwater.

Hydro-Quebec is a major supplier of electricity to the northeastern U.S. The design calls for the power line to be buried in the bottom sediment of Lake Champlain, the Hudson Canal, and the Hudson River.

The project is being developed by a Toronto company, which sees the underwater design is a way to avoid the environmental and political problems of constructing new powerline corridors through communities. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article

Underwater Quebec-NYC electricity transmission line planned for Lake Champlain

State officials unveiled a new plan yesterday to run a high-voltage electricity transmission line from Canada down through New York's Champlain Valley. The "Champlain-Hudson Express Project" would carry power along the three-hundred mile long corridor to New York City.  Go to full article

Wind power gets a boost

2009 was a bumper year for new windmills. But as Mark Brush reports, if it weren't for government money, it might have been a bad year.  Go to full article
Fort Covington Dam
Fort Covington Dam

Fort Covington Dam coming down

A hundred-year old dam on the Salmon River in Franklin County is coming down. The Fort Covington dam was last used for hydropower in the 1950s. It's been crumbling ever since. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article

Preview: Energy Fair in Canton

NCPR is media sponsor for the 14th annual Sustainable Energy Fair at the SUNY Canton Miller Campus Center this weekend. This year's fair includes more than 100 workshops and exhibitors, green home tours, environmental theater and more. Todd Moe talks with organizer Patricia Greene.  Go to full article

NYPA: "glad to talk" on steel mill megawatts

The head of the New York Power Authority says he'd be "glad to talk" with a developer who wants to build a steel mill in Massena. Steel Development Company chairman John Correnti says he wants to build a $200-million rebar plant and create 200 jobs. Martha Foley reports.  Go to full article

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