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News stories tagged with "prisontime"

View from a subway platform in Bedford-Stuyvesant, one of the neighborhoods in New York city with the highest concentration of men and women admitted to prison. Photo: Natasha Haverty
View from a subway platform in Bedford-Stuyvesant, one of the neighborhoods in New York city with the highest concentration of men and women admitted to prison. Photo: Natasha Haverty

Cuomo: "reducing the madness of an incarceration society"

Cuomo also talked about the state of prisons in New York yesterday. And according to the Governor, there's good news, and there's bad news.  Go to full article

Vt. report: Impaired parolees need better services

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) A Vermont legislative committee says the state should add early intervention services for parolees with mental illness, substance abuse or other problems to help them stay out of trouble.

The draft report says the services should be considered a priority over the addition of any new residential facilities for this group of parolees.  Go to full article
Milk Not Jails' Lauren Melodia and her team want to convince New York to invest in farms, not prisons. Photo: David Sommerstein
Milk Not Jails' Lauren Melodia and her team want to convince New York to invest in farms, not prisons. Photo: David Sommerstein

What could replace the North Country's prison industry?

This week, our Prison Time Media Project is examining the North Country's vast complex of prisons. It's an industry from Cape Vincent to Chateaugay that employs thousands of people in a region with few other options.

Today we ask - what if? What if the crime rate continues to drop and the number of inmates locked up continues to fall? What if, as Governor Cuomo has advocated, New York keeps closing prisons, as it did in Lyon Mountain and Gabriels?

What's next for the North Country's prison towns?

One tiny not-for-profit from New York City has an idea. Take the money saved from shuttering prisons and spend that money on agriculture. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Police take a suspect into custody as part of a drug sweep in Saranac Lake.  This strategy has been used for decades to reduce drug-related crime in the North Country. Photo: Chris Knight
Police take a suspect into custody as part of a drug sweep in Saranac Lake. This strategy has been used for decades to reduce drug-related crime in the North Country. Photo: Chris Knight

North Country drug war continues, despite debate

This year, North Country Public Radio is looking in-depth at America's 40 year era of mass incarceration - a period of American history that saw the massive growth of prisons around the US, and here in our region. This week, we're focusing on how those policies changed the North Country.

A big part of the rising inmate population has stemmed from the war on drugs. Under state and Federal law, millions of felons have spent much longer sentences behind bars.

That's starting to change. In 2009, New York state reformed the Rockefeller drug laws. As a result, the number of drug offenders behind bars in New York's has dropped by two-thirds.

Despite state and national debate, however, many local and state law enforcement agencies still use many of the same tough-on-crime strategies that have shaped America's drug war for decades.  Go to full article
Brother Yusuf  Abdul-Wasi (R) and Joe Hackett (L) with moderator Russell Banks at an event hosted by John Brown Lives. Photo: Brian Mann
Brother Yusuf Abdul-Wasi (R) and Joe Hackett (L) with moderator Russell Banks at an event hosted by John Brown Lives. Photo: Brian Mann

A prison inmate, a corrections worker, a conversation

This week, our Prison Time Media Project is focusing in-depth on the the world of corrections here in the North Country.

There are more than a dozen state and Federal prisons in our region, from Cape Vincent to the town of Moreau. The industry is a pillar of the economy in many rural towns.

But those prisons are also a place where prison guards, civilian workers and inmates struggle every day to communicate, grappling with huge differences of race and class.

Two men -- a former inmate and a former corrections worker -- are working to bridge that divide by talking about their shared experience behind bars.  Go to full article
Community leaders meeting in Chateaugay to orchestrate fight to save the state correctional facility. Photo: Brian Mann
Community leaders meeting in Chateaugay to orchestrate fight to save the state correctional facility. Photo: Brian Mann

How prisons became the North Country's normal

This year, North Country Public Radio has been looking in-depth at New York's Rockefeller drug laws and how those laws reshaped our state over the last forty years.

This week, the series will focus on the North Country, which is home to more than a dozen state and federal prisons.

Corrections work has grown into one of the region's biggest and most controversial industries, providing thousands of high paying jobs, and anchoring the economies in towns from Malone to Moriah.

As part of our Prison Time Media Project, Brian Mann has a special report on how the North Country became a magnet for new prisons and how the industry is facing new scrutiny.  Go to full article
Prison hospital gate. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/atbaker/2948498050/">Adam Baker</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Prison hospital gate. Photo: Adam Baker, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

In final days, inmates care for inmates

Yesterday as part our Prison Time Media Project we heard the story of an inmate at Coxsackie prison, who fought to get home after he was diagnosed with terminal cancer.

It's a growing issue for America's huge prison system, as more inmates than ever are aging and dying behind bars.

Here in New York, hundreds of sick and dying inmates navigate the compassionate release system every year, but very few actually make it out of prison.

And for those inmates who die behind bars, prison officials offer them hospice care. As Natasha Haverty reports, those men and women are supported and comforted in their final days by fellow inmates.  Go to full article

Dying inmates in NY struggle to get home

This year, North Country Public Radio has been looking in-depth at the growth of the prison industry here in our region, across New York and around the country.

Over the last four decades, we've seen the number of men and women behind bars soar--many serving long mandatory sentences for low-level crimes.

And one side-effect of those tough-on-crime policies today is that the number of elderly inmates is surging--growing by almost eighty percent from 2000 through 2009.

Prison officials across the US are struggling to sort out what that means, how we think about and care for inmates who grow old and die in our prisons.

In part one of our investigative report, Natasha Haverty found that despite recent reforms to the system, many terminally ill inmates are forced to remain behind bars even when they no longer appear to be a threat to society. Even some prison officials think the process for allowing inmates to die at home needs fixing.  Go to full article

Dying inmates in NY struggle to get home

This year, North Country Public Radio has been looking in-depth at the growth of the prison industry here in our region, across New York and around the country.

Over the last four decades, we've seen the number of men and women behind bars soar--many serving long mandatory sentences for low-level crimes.

And one side-effect of those tough-on-crime policies today is that the number of elderly inmates is surging--growing by almost eighty percent from 2000 through 2009.

Prison officials across the US are struggling to sort out what that means, how we think about and care for inmates who grow old and die in our prisons.

In part one of our investigative report, Natasha Haverty found that despite recent reforms to the system, many terminally ill inmates are forced to remain behind bars even when they no longer appear to be a threat to society. Even some prison officials think the process for allowing inmates to die at home needs fixing.  Go to full article

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