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News stories tagged with "privacy"

John Sullivan. Photo: NYS Police
John Sullivan. Photo: NYS Police

Watertown postal worker charged with felony eavesdropping

State police in Watertown say they've arrested a Post Office worker for allegedly eavesdropping on other postal service employees.

John Sullivan, age 50, has been charged with one count of eavesdropping. That's a felony under New York state law.  Go to full article

Gates-funded student data group to shut down

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) The head of a student data processing organization says it will shut down in the coming months following criticism that led to the recent loss of its last active client--New York state.

The Atlanta-based nonprofit inBloom was started with $100 million in financing from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and Carnegie Corp.

The goal was to give educators a data tool to personalize instruction. But the idea of storing sensitive student data in cloud-based servers had parents and lawmakers worried about privacy and security.  Go to full article
New York State Education Department building in Albany, NY, Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NYSED_Building_Night_2.JPG">Matt Wade</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
New York State Education Department building in Albany, NY, Photo: Matt Wade, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

New York pulls out of inBloom student database

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) New York education officials say they will not store student information with the data storage firm inBloom.

State Education Department spokesman Dennis Tomkins says Wednesday that the state has directed inBloom to delete data that's been stored so far.

The move follows this week's passage of the state budget, which includes a provision to end the state's relationship with inBloom.  Go to full article
New York State Education Department building in Albany, NY, Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NYSED_Building_Night_2.JPG">Matt Wade</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
New York State Education Department building in Albany, NY, Photo: Matt Wade, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Speaker Silver urges delay of NY student database

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver has sent a letter to New York Education Commissioner John King Jr. saying the department should hold off on transferring sensitive student information to a new statewide database.

The letter, also signed by nearly 50 Assembly Democrats, says the lawmakers were swayed by testimony about potential flaws in the plan to share data with Atlanta-based InBloom.  Go to full article

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Dan Pacheco, a professor at Syracuse University, demonstrates a small drone equipped with a camera. Photo: Ryan Delaney
Dan Pacheco, a professor at Syracuse University, demonstrates a small drone equipped with a camera. Photo: Ryan Delaney

Privacy vs. the economy as Syracuse considers drones

Syracuse lawmakers have begun weighing the pros and cons of being a part of the domestic drone industry.

The Common Council's public safety committee held its first hearing on the matter late last week.  Go to full article
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY). Photo: Mark Kurtz
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY). Photo: Mark Kurtz

In face of NSA scandal, Gillibrand looks to balance privacy, security

New York leaders in Washington want more information about the growth in domestic spying.

It was revealed last week that the National Security Agency collects phone data and private emails directly from the servers of major Internet companies such as Google, Microsoft, Facebook, and Yahoo.  Go to full article
Joe Kummer, president of Propulsive Wing in Elbridge, N.Y. demonstrates his prototype unmanned aerial vehicle.  Photo: Ryan Delaney/WRVO
Joe Kummer, president of Propulsive Wing in Elbridge, N.Y. demonstrates his prototype unmanned aerial vehicle. Photo: Ryan Delaney/WRVO

Why upstate communities want to be drone testing sites

A coalition of universities and defense contractors in upstate New York has submitted a bid to become a federal research and test site for drones.

The Federal Aviation Administration is working on regulations for the use of unmanned aircraft in American airspace by 2015.

To do that, the FAA will name six testing sites - and seeing economic opportunities, upstate New York wants to have one of those sites.  Go to full article
Gregory McNeal
Gregory McNeal

Writing the rules for domestic drone use

Drones are smaller, cheaper, and easier to use than ever, and their cameras are more powerful than ever.

In the near future, drones may be used to find criminals, track wildlife, or find a lost hiker in a remote canyon. They could also be used to look in places where we're not used to prying eyes.

Law professor Gregory McNeal studies the legalities of drone use at Pepperdine University in California. McNeal believes local government, not the courts, should lead the way in writing the rules in the drone era.

He says our notions of privacy may differ from what the law says. McNeal told David Sommerstein the Supreme Court has upheld the right of law enforcement to look for wrongdoing from a helicopter or plane.  Go to full article

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