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News stories tagged with "property-tax"

Gov. Andrew Cuomo, flanked at Monday's event by Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano and Ulster County Executive Michael Hein. Photo: Gov. Cuomo's office, via <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/governorandrewcuomo/13227891004/sizes/z/in/photostream/">Flicker</a>
Gov. Andrew Cuomo, flanked at Monday's event by Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano and Ulster County Executive Michael Hein. Photo: Gov. Cuomo's office, via Flicker

Cuomo pushes property tax freeze as support lags in NYS legislature

Gov. Andrew Cuomo has enlisted the aid of some local government leaders to promote his tax freeze proposal, which has been losing ground in the New York State legislature. Cuomo promoted his plan Monday surrounded by several county executives from across the state.

The state legislature doesn't support the plan, but Cuomo says he's signed up 150 local government leaders as supporters.  Go to full article
Education funding protesters outside Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office Wednesday. Photo: Karen DeWitt
Education funding protesters outside Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office Wednesday. Photo: Karen DeWitt

More money for schools, environment, in NYS Assembly budget proposal

Assembly Democrats say there should be more money for schools and the environment, and major changes to Gov. Andrew Cuomo's plan to freeze property taxes. The Assembly's one-house budget resolution is the first step in reaching agreement on a final spending plan by the end of March.  Go to full article
Gov. Andrew Cuomo delivering the 2014-15 Executive Budget Address. Photo: Gov. Cuomo's office via <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/governorandrewcuomo/12075674644/sizes/z/in/set-72157640020641724/">Flickr</a>
Gov. Andrew Cuomo delivering the 2014-15 Executive Budget Address. Photo: Gov. Cuomo's office via Flickr

Do NYS counties have a better property tax cut plan than Cuomo?

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is starting a new push for the property tax freeze plan he outlined in his state budget address this January. Meanwhile, counties in the state say they have a better idea, which they say could result in lower property taxes in New York for even longer.

Cuomo's campaign is aimed at enlisting the aid of the public to help convince the legislature to approve the plan.  Go to full article
Empire Plaza in Albany.
Empire Plaza in Albany.

Dividing lines forming over Cuomo's tax commission plan

Divisions are forming in the upcoming debate over tax cuts that's likely to dominate the new legislative session.  Go to full article
The St. Lawrence County courthouse and legislative building.
The St. Lawrence County courthouse and legislative building.

St. Lawrence County begins slow road to fiscal health

After several years of dire financial news, last week brought a break in the clouds for St. Lawrence County. The county got $1.8 million in revenue from the Akwesasne Mohawk casino. And Governor Cuomo signed into law home rule legislation that will allow the county to raise the sales tax by 1%.

St. Lawrence has been one of only five counties in the state with a sales tax at 7%. County legislative chairman Jonathan Putney says an 8% sales tax will take effect on December 1st. He says it should raise 13 million dollars a year for the county and several local governments that will get a share.

Putney tells David Sommerstein that puts the county on a long road to financial health. And it brings good news to property taxpayers in the form of a property tax cut of 14% next year. "The bulk of the money goes to property tax stabilization," says Putney. "Some of the funds have been targeted for infrastructure. And this will help us over time, through our budgeting process, to slowly rebuild our fund balance."  Go to full article
New York state's Senate chamber. The Senate has one week to approve home rule legislation long sought by St. Lawrence County. Photo: JvL, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
New York state's Senate chamber. The Senate has one week to approve home rule legislation long sought by St. Lawrence County. Photo: JvL, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Bill that could raise SLC sales tax passes Assembly

Home rule legislation that would allow St. Lawrence County to raise its sales tax by one percent passed in the New York State Assembly Thursday. County legislative chairman John Putney says the bill now needs Senate approval.  Go to full article
Jonathan Putney, chair of the St. Lawrence County Legislature, in Waddington. Photo: Still from Putney campaign video
Jonathan Putney, chair of the St. Lawrence County Legislature, in Waddington. Photo: Still from Putney campaign video

St. Lawrence County pushes to increase sales tax

St. Lawrence County legislators are pushing for home rule legislation, so they can raise the county's sales tax from three percent to four percent. They plan to use the additional money to reduce property taxes. But some don't think that's in the county's best interest.  Go to full article

St. Lawrence County to consider overriding property tax cap

The St. Lawrence County Board of Legislators is holding a public hearing Monday night about overriding the state's new two-percent property tax cap. Board Chair Sallie Brothers says the county's financial situation doesn't look good.

She says they could cut all non-mandated services, such as alcohol and substance abuse programs, the planning department, youth programs, and nutrition services for the elderly. Or she says they could raise the property tax.  Go to full article
Thereís no question that thereís a train that has left the station. Itís going down a reckless track that is not good for the children.

Educators and school boards speak out against property tax cap

State lawmakers are close to approving a cap on property taxes in New York, but the groups most impacted say they are still trying to change what they see as the most potentially harmful parts of the package. Karen DeWitt reports.  Go to full article

Skelos: Senate will consider tax cap exemptions

Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos says he's willing to consider an easing of Governor Cuomo's proposal for a hard 2% property tax cap, if that will make it more likely for the bill to become law. In Albany, Karen DeWitt has this report.  Go to full article

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