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News stories tagged with "property-taxes"

Governor Andrew Cuomo Photo: Mark Kurtz
Governor Andrew Cuomo Photo: Mark Kurtz

Cuomo urges consolidation on small "insolvent" school districts

Gov. Andrew Cuomo took aim again yesterday at small upstate and Northern New York school districts, which he says need to consolidate to survive. "You have many small school districts that are almost insolvent from an economic point of view, due to their size," Cuomo said.  Go to full article
How will Gov. Cuomo's new budget plan actually impact how much property tax New Yorkers pay? Well, it's complicated. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/59937401@N07/5856941321/in/photolist-9VymAV-9Vynke-2SgvEj-a6nVRn-4QuRpr-dQ6vfn-cssr8b-6KSFLB-2pgAY9-88cmk-88cnD-ifXYRG-bmsT4u-9VB9gG-9Vyij6-pK5TN-7VHGAR-bGi9gP-bGi9vB-bGi9pi-bGi9Kg-5CLWT3-bvn9BA-bvn9FG-bvn9DU-bJgWcn-bJgWeD-bvn9CY-4qLQnz-StQqv-4iHTRm-8Sb3VN-6Rfw6N-7xBoCa-bvhFtG-8jpqA5-rCBfK-azfJfM-ezXUkt-67UDHm-5ehLEB-79H6wC-5M1Cx-9Q2Eyr-5ADaAn-25GFHk-4v73Jz-7a6Ngu-7a6Ncu-7a2Y96-8tmkyP">Images Money</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
How will Gov. Cuomo's new budget plan actually impact how much property tax New Yorkers pay? Well, it's complicated. Photo: Images Money, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Cuomo's plan to freeze local property taxes has lawmakers confused

The legislature has finished its hearings on Governor Cuomo's budget proposal, and legislators will start crafting a spending plan once they return from the President's Day break. One of the final hearings focused on the governor's tax cutting plans, and lawmakers had plenty of questions, especially about his plan to freeze local property taxes. Legislators at the hearing quizzed Governor Cuomo's tax commissioner on that plan. Tax Commissioner Thomas Mattox admits it's complex.  Go to full article
Gov. Cuomo delivering his fourth annual budget address in Albany Tuesday. Photo: Gov. Cuomo's office.
Gov. Cuomo delivering his fourth annual budget address in Albany Tuesday. Photo: Gov. Cuomo's office.

NY's Cuomo proposes $137.2B budget with tax cuts

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is proposing an election year budget of $137.2 billion that he says keeps a tight leash on spending even as it provides business, property and estate tax relief.

It holds state operating costs to a 1.7% increase over last year. It relies heavily on expectations that the federal government will grant New York a $10 billion waiver on Medicaid spending.  Go to full article
US Sen. Charles Schumer. File photo: Propublica, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
US Sen. Charles Schumer. File photo: Propublica, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Schumer wants vets to get their NY property tax credit

Thousands of veterans in New York are missing out on property tax breaks. Sen. Charles Schumer says that's largely because they don't know about them.

Schumer is trying to get the word out about a New York State program that can save veterans hundreds of dollars a year. He visited Herkimer County this week, where more than 6,000 veterans are eligible.  Go to full article
Celeste Beeman of Port Henry, a certified nurse's assistant at Horace Nye, protests the sale outside the Essex County Courthouse. Photo: Chris Morris, courtesy <em>Adirondack Daily Enterprise</em>
Celeste Beeman of Port Henry, a certified nurse's assistant at Horace Nye, protests the sale outside the Essex County Courthouse. Photo: Chris Morris, courtesy Adirondack Daily Enterprise

Deepening budget woes force local governments into "moral" dilemmas

Half a decade after the Great Recession began, many local governments around the US and here in the North Country are still hurting. Core services and programs are being scaled back, cut or privatized. Last month alone, another 9,000 public sector workers were laid off nationwide.

While the private sector economy is creaking back to life, government experts say they sources of revenue that fund local programs haven't revived. As Brian Mann reports, that's sparked a new debate over what government should look like--not at the Federal level, but at the grassroots.  Go to full article
But voters said "No" to Plattsburgh's tax cap-exceeding plan. Photo: plattscsd.org
But voters said "No" to Plattsburgh's tax cap-exceeding plan. Photo: plattscsd.org

Voters say yes to most school budgets

It was school budget day in New York State yesterday. Voters from one side of the state to the other had their say on their local district's spending plan for the coming year.

It was a tough year for the schools, with a continuing loss of state education aid, and a new state-imposed limit on property taxes used to fund many of the programs and positions local communities value.

The vast majority of budgets passed in the North Country; most including significant cuts in teachers and programs. Martha Foley talked with Brian Mann for a survey of the regional results.  Go to full article
North Elba supervisor Roby Politi with Gov. Andrew Cuomo yesterday (Source: Nathan Brown, Adirondack Daily Enterprise, used by permission)
North Elba supervisor Roby Politi with Gov. Andrew Cuomo yesterday (Source: Nathan Brown, Adirondack Daily Enterprise, used by permission)

Cuomo brings agenda, momentum, to Lake Placid

Governor Andrew Cuomo dominated Albany this year, pushing his austerity budget through the legislature on time with only token opposition.

With his poll numbers still high, Cuomo is barnstorming the state again, hoping to pass another ambitious slate of bills before the current session ends June 20.

Yesterday, the governor brought his "People First Campaign" to the Olympic region, pushing for ethics reform, a cap on local property taxes, and a bill that would legalize same-sex marriage. Chris Morris has our report.  Go to full article
The general membership is upset they're even asking us to give back our raises. 4% of $30,000 isnít a lot of money.

CSEA local says no concessions in Essex County

Essex County is still struggling to contain a projected property tax increase of 10 percent next year. Supervisors have considered and rejected selling the county nursing home, and an across the board cut in payments to outside agencies.

Essex County Chairman Randy Douglas has also called for the Civil Service Employees Union's 400 county employees to except a pay freeze.

After months of silence, the union local president Mike McGinn said this week there's no chance the union will agree to pay freezes or other concessions.  Go to full article
Newcomb's public school wouldn't survive without state property tax payments, which total roughly $2.5 million per year (Photo:  Brian Mann)
Newcomb's public school wouldn't survive without state property tax payments, which total roughly $2.5 million per year (Photo: Brian Mann)

State property tax payments in Adirondacks face more scrutiny, debate

Over the last couple of weeks, counties across the North Country have been hiking their property taxes, often by double-digit amounts. But a big chunk of those property taxes won't come from local residents. In many communities and in many school districts the state of New York is the biggest property owner and pays the lion's share of taxes.

As we heard yesterday, one state agency has already suspended its property tax payments, costing counties and schools millions of dollars. In this second part our two-part series, Brian Mann reports that local leaders across the region fear that their state property tax payments could also be cut.  Go to full article
The state of New York owes Northville Central School hundreds of thousands of dollars in unpaid property taxes (Photo:  Northville CSD website)
The state of New York owes Northville Central School hundreds of thousands of dollars in unpaid property taxes (Photo: Northville CSD website)

Are state property tax payments to Adirondacks a sure thing?

In many parts of the Adirondack Park, the biggest engine of the local economy isn't tourism or timber or mining. The main driver of the cash economy is the state of New York.

The state funds thousands of jobs in the Park at prisons, hospitals, schools, and mental health facilities.

But Albany also makes tens of millions of dollars in direct property tax payments every year to local governments and school districts, while asking for almost no services in return.

With New York's budget deficit expected to top ten billion dollars next year, community leaders are worried that those tax payments could be squeezed.

In part one of a two part series, Brian Mann looks at communities in the Park that have already seen the state cut off their property tax payments.  Go to full article

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