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News stories tagged with "pruning"

Spring surprise--voles at work. Photo: Martha Foley
Spring surprise--voles at work. Photo: Martha Foley

Why does my lawn look like a giant ant farm?

The spring thaw has finally reached dirt, revealing the winter damage underneath. On lawns, that could include dramatic networks of dirt-lined runways left under this winter's snow pack by voles.

Voles work the surface, tunneling through where the snow meets the lawn. They're vegetarians, and like to eat away at the roots of the grass. Horticulturist Amy Ivy says the lawn's probably too soft to walk on yet, and it's probably too soon to do too much in the way of repair just yet. When things dry out a bit, she suggests raking the damaged area lightly, to level the tunneled areas out. And have some grass seed on hand to reseed after the weather warms up.

Moles throw up bigger mounds of dirt from their underground tunnels. Rake those to spread the dirt around; those areas can be reseeded to grass later as well.

Amy says it's also time to do some remedial pruning where trees and shrubs were broken during the winter. And she talks about best practices for pruning flowering shrubs now.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/cafemama/3554624390/in/photolist-6q7nZq-9bWxWy-4FjXbD-48C15n-4B7ks-d33Bcu-4B1fJL-84PDiw-hos2oJ-kmJZQ-Po95f-9kkqg2-hovRDL-ahtbyB-ieJUqN-adLfQb-9Ak9XY-6vikT9-JVDMJ-dAKsT8-83YQcJ-6tNG25-6bCcDi-eh96Pz-6fGSZF-db5C2U-db5BxQ-db5BMC-NxEpj-a4sQ2N-8o4Pya-6f6qui-7PKvEd-4WbwDb-6KeovC-5ek7mn-4X8zQM-2kaEaN-5fgsDp-6jCjBC-7YiN6B-8sZy9F-d33BaN-d33Be9-dWehH-89JiNr-avWqyt-9LbTLM-81LwZ9-4LAwRo">Sarah Gilbert</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Sarah Gilbert, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Gardening call in gleanings: potato scab, blueberry canes, green manure

Horticulturist Amy Ivy and Martha Foley takes up some odds and ends of questions listeners had during our Spring Gardening Call-in program. Issues covered include scab on beets and potatoes, care of blueberry canes, and what you can use in place of compost if you can't get hold of it.  Go to full article
Mature apple tree before and after pruning. Photo: W. Lord, UNH Co-operative Extension
Mature apple tree before and after pruning. Photo: W. Lord, UNH Co-operative Extension

It's time to prune fruit trees

This is the best time of the season to prune your apple and other fruit trees. Horticulturist Amy Ivy has the best tips and how-to information to help insure good production.  Go to full article
Wait a little longer for the intense cold to pass before pruning. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/ndrwfgg/82103133/">Andrew Fogg</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Wait a little longer for the intense cold to pass before pruning. Photo: Andrew Fogg, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Gardening: Is it too soon to prune?

Martha Foley and Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulturalist Amy Ivy talk about what it is, and isn't, safe to do in your garden this early in a very chilly year, and how to simulate spring indoors.  Go to full article
Mature apple tree before and after pruning. Photo: W. Lord, UNH Co-operative Extension
Mature apple tree before and after pruning. Photo: W. Lord, UNH Co-operative Extension

The science and art of pruning apple trees

Pruning apple trees can bring trepidation to gardeners, but pruning improves the tree's vigor and fruit production. If you have an apple tree in your backyard, now is the time to start thinking about pulling out the pruners. Todd Moe talks with horticulturist Amy Ivy, who says now is a great time to start planning for pruning in March and April. She has some tips for best way to prune apple trees - and why you should take the time to prune.  Go to full article

Time to prune hydrangeas

Most of them, anyway. But not all hydrangeas are the same. Should you cut everything back? Or leave some of last year's growth? First, you've got to now what kind of hydrangea you've got. Pee gee? Old-fashioned Annabelle? And then there are the blue hydrangeas. As Amy Ivy tells Martha Foley, the formula is pretty straightforward, but each of these types requires a little different treatment.  Go to full article

Heavy snow means winter yard maintenance

Trees and shrubs are suffering the consequences of well over a foot of wet, heavy snow brought by back-to-back storms last week, not to mention the heavy winds in between. Horticulturist Amy Ivy says it's not a crisis -- like a heavy ice storm might be. And she told Martha Foley that early March isn't really a bad time for pruning away the damage.  Go to full article
Late blight
Late blight

Late blight hitting potatoes too, and last call for pruning

Martha Foley gets an update from horticulturist Amy Ivy on late blight disease, which kills the foliage of tomato and potato plants. And they talk about summer pruning.  Go to full article

April is last-minute pruning time

Buds are swelling on trees around the region, but there is still time to prune this month. Martha Foley chats with horticulturist Amy Ivy about another early spring garden chore.  Go to full article

Tips for spring pruning

In early spring, it's a good idea to assess your garden and yard to administer early spring first aid for any damaged plants and shrubs. Horticulturist Amy Ivy has some tips for pruning. She spoke with Martha Foley.  Go to full article

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