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News stories tagged with "pruyn"

Tom Welsh, a fishing guide from Johnsburg, speaks at a public hearing on the new Finch Pruyn lands in Minerva. Photo: Nicholas Mann
Tom Welsh, a fishing guide from Johnsburg, speaks at a public hearing on the new Finch Pruyn lands in Minerva. Photo: Nicholas Mann

Public comment period ending for new Adk Park lands

This is the final week for the public to offer input and opinions about how to manage tens of thousands of acres of new public lands in the Adirondack Park.

The Adirondack Park Agency held hearings across the state to gather feedback on seven different proposals for how lands in Indian Lake and Minerva should be classified.

The hearings have wrapped up, but people still have until the end of the day on Friday to send written comments.  Go to full article
DEC Commissioner Peter Grannis has worked closely with Nature Conservancy leaders
DEC Commissioner Peter Grannis has worked closely with Nature Conservancy leaders

DEC, Nature Conservancy partnership on land deals reshapes Adirondacks

This morning we begin a three-part series looking at the major land acquisitions that are reshaping the Adirondack Park. Hundreds of thousands of acres have changed hands in the Adirondacks, bought from private owners by New York State. This week we'll look at how those sometimes controversial deals are made, and who makes them.
Attorney General Andrew Cuomo and state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli announced earlier this month that they will investigate the 2008 purchase of 20,000 acres in Clinton County, and tomorrow we'll look at that current controversy.

Today, we start with the big picture.
Many of these big land deals have resulted from a close partnership between the state Department of Environmental Conservation and one environmental group: the Adirondack Nature Conservancy.
Supporters praise the partnership for facilitating protection of prized lakes, mountains and open space. Critics say the relationship is too close and warrants more scrutiny. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article

Finch Pruyn deal at risk as governor proposes moratorium on Adirondack land buys

Governor Paterson's budget plan would slash also tens of millions of dollars from environmental and land conservation programs. In the proposal unveiled yesterday, state officials say new land purchases in the Adirondack Park should be suspended at least through 2012. The news comes at a time when the Adirondack Nature Conservancy is hoping to sell more than 50,000 acres of timberland to the state. Martha Foley has details.  Go to full article
Exploring a valley of the Adirondacks
Exploring a valley of the Adirondacks

Big conservation deal opens new windows for research in the Adirondacks

In the deepest valleys of the Adirondack Mountains, scientists are exploring forests and wetlands that have been hidden away for decades. Researchers with New York state and the Nature Conservancy are surveying tens of thousands of acres of land acquired last year as part of the massive Finch-Pruyn deal. Discoveries made this summer will shape conservation and timber harvesting in the Adirondacks for decades. Here's part one of Brian Mann's two-part report.  Go to full article

Preview: The Pruyn family?s legacy

Erin Coe, Chief Curator of the Hyde Collection in Glens Falls will talk about the cultural legacy of the Pruyn Family at the Adirondack Museum tonight (7:30). Her lecture will highlight a broad range of objects from the family's collections. She told Todd Moe that the Pruyn family had a big impact on the economic, cultural, educational and civic life of Glens Falls and the Adirondacks.  Go to full article
OK Slip Falls, one of the prizes of the Finch, Pruyn deal (Photo:  C. Heilman, courtesy of Adk Nature Conservancy)
OK Slip Falls, one of the prizes of the Finch, Pruyn deal (Photo: C. Heilman, courtesy of Adk Nature Conservancy)

NY to expand forest preserve with massive piece of Finch, Pruyn tract

State environment officials and the Nature Conservancy say they've struck a deal that will protect more than 134,000 acres of timberland in the Adirondacks. The plan, unveiled late Thursday, was described as historic by DEC commissioner Pete Grannis. It will affect most of the former Finch, Pruyn lands, which the Nature Conservancy purchased last year for $110 million. 57,000 acres will be added to the state forest preserve. Another 73,000 acres will continue to be logged, but all other forms of development will be blocked by conservation easements. Most of the land lies in the towns of Newcomb, Minerva, Long Lake, Indian Lake, and North Hudson. State officials say it's not clear how much taxpayers will pay for the massive preservation deal. Local government leaders have raised concerns about the impact on local economies and the lack of public hearings for the project. But backers of the plan say it strikes a balance between the needs of local communities and the environment.

Brian Mann spoke with Mike Carr, head of the Adirondack Nature Conservancy, and with DEC Commissioner Pete Grannis.  Go to full article

Local government leaders praise Finch deal

Local government leaders don't often favor big conservation deals. But the plan unveiled Thursday drew glowing reviews from town supervisors in Indian Lake and Long Lake. Town boards haven't had a chance to review the deal in detail, but Long Lake's Greg Wallace described it as a "win-win" project. He spoke with Brian Mann.  Go to full article

More on the Nature Conservancy land deal

Martha Foley talks with NCPR Adirondack Bureau Chief Brian Mann a little more about the land deal unveiled yesterday.  Go to full article
Finch Pruyn's holdings include the Boreas Ponds (Photo courtesy of the Adirondack Explorer magazine)
Finch Pruyn's holdings include the Boreas Ponds (Photo courtesy of the Adirondack Explorer magazine)

Frinch Pruyn hopes to sell all assets in the Adirondack-North Country

Finch Pruyn, the biggest private employer and one of the largest landowners in the North Country, has announced it hopes to sell all its assets. Jonathan Brown has details.  Go to full article
Finch, Pruyn in the early 1900s
Finch, Pruyn in the early 1900s

Finch, Pruyn To Sell Glens Falls Mill

Officials at Finch, Pruyn & Company say they plan to sell their paper mill in Glens Falls. The plant has anchored the region's economy for over a century and employs roughly 850 workers. As Brian Mann reports, the company says there are no plans to shut down the plant.  Go to full article

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