Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "punishment"

State Sen. Ruth Hassell-Thompson Photo: NYS Senate
State Sen. Ruth Hassell-Thompson Photo: NYS Senate

Lawmakers look to "close gap" on domestic violence laws

Activists and lawmakers say better protections are needed for battered men, women and children across New York. New York Sen. Ruth Hassell-Thompson is co-sponsor of a group of bills that supporters say will close gaps in the protection of victims of domestic and sexual violence.  Go to full article

Nine heroin overdoses in one day escalate calls for change

This week NCPR is looking in-depth at the crisis of heroin use in rural New York and Vermont (hear those stories here.) Some officials say there needs to be a better way to track heroin overdoses and deaths. On Tuesday, nine people in Burlington overdosed in a single day, prompting calls for better coordination between police and healthcare experts.  Go to full article
Cooking heroin. Experts say the drug is cheap and easy to find in the North Country. Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Heroin.JPG">Psychonaught</a>, public domain
Cooking heroin. Experts say the drug is cheap and easy to find in the North Country. Photo: Psychonaught, public domain

Hooked on heroin, searching for treatment

This week, North Country Public Radio has been looking at the rapid spread of heroin in rural New York (find those stories here). It's easy to find and cheap to buy and experts say it's ruining people's lives at an unprecedented rate.

But this isn't the first time heroin has surged in the North Country's small towns. A decade ago, rural heroin spiked in small towns and college campuses across the region. Today, we're returning to Brian Mann's story from 2004 about two recovering heroin addicts struggling to find methadone treatment, driving long-distance to Syracuse.  Go to full article
Donnie (in the foreground) and Didd on the bus leaving the North Country. Photo: Amy Finkel, for Gothamist, used with permission.
Donnie (in the foreground) and Didd on the bus leaving the North Country. Photo: Amy Finkel, for Gothamist, used with permission.

North Country inmates on the bus: free and nowhere to go

Every year, hundreds of men are shipped to prisons here in the North Country, to correctional facilities in Watertown or Malone, Moriah or Ray Brook. We've been telling the story of the region's prison industry with our Prison Time Media Project.
But every year, hundreds of men are also released back into society after serving their time in state or Federal lock-ups.

Often, former inmates are sent back downstate with little preparation and few resources for reentering society. Many begin their new lives with a bus ticket, a new set of clothes, and a small amount of cash.

Amy Finkel is a journalist and documentary filmmaker. She's working on a new project looking at reform and education programs in prisons and she recently published a photo essay in the online magazine Gothamist.

Her photos capture the bus journey that one group of men made from Saranac Lake after being released from prison back to New York City. She spoke about her work with Martha Foley.  Go to full article
This inmate drawing on a prison envelope is part of the "Cellblock Visions" exhibit on display at SLU's Brush Art Gallery through mid-April. Photo courtesy Phyllis Kornfeld
This inmate drawing on a prison envelope is part of the "Cellblock Visions" exhibit on display at SLU's Brush Art Gallery through mid-April. Photo courtesy Phyllis Kornfeld

In Canton, "Cellblock Visions" shows off prison inmates' art

There's an alternative art world flourishing in American prisons. "Cellblock Visions," an exhibit at the Brush Art Gallery at St. Lawrence University this spring, features artwork by inmates from county jails to death row. Curator Phyllis Kornfeld, who has taught art courses in the prison system for more than 30 years, will give a lecture on the exhibit in Griffiths Arts Center, room 123, Tuesday at 7pm.

Todd Moe spoke with Kornfeld, who began her career teaching art in prisons in Oklahoma in 1983 (hear that interview by clicking "listen" above, or read the transcription below.) Today, she works at prisons in Massachusetts. She says even after 30 years, she finds the art created behind bars to be "fresh and amazing". Kornfeld says men and women inmates, having no previous training, turn to art for a sense of self-respect, respect for others and a way to find peace.

View pictures from the exhibit below.  Go to full article
Five Omar Mualimm-ak, speaking at St. Lawrence University earlier this month. Photo: Tzintzun Aguilar
Five Omar Mualimm-ak, speaking at St. Lawrence University earlier this month. Photo: Tzintzun Aguilar

Five Mualimm-ak: A voice out of solitary confinement

Last month, the state of New York made sweeping changes to its use of solitary confinement. The new policy, signed by a federal judge, prohibits anyone under the age of 18, women who are pregnant, and people with severe mental illness, from being locked away in solitary.

Five Mualimm-ak helped write the new protocol. He's a prison reform activist. Mualimm-ak spent five years of his life in solitary confinement, out of 12 years he served inside New York prisons on charges that were later overturned. He was in Canton last week for talks and events at St. Lawrence University, and sat down with Martha Foley.  Go to full article
Community leaders meeting in Chateaugay to orchestrate fight to save the state correctional facility. Photo: Brian Mann
Community leaders meeting in Chateaugay to orchestrate fight to save the state correctional facility. Photo: Brian Mann

How prisons became the North Country's normal

This year, North Country Public Radio has been looking in-depth at New York's Rockefeller drug laws and how those laws reshaped our state over the last forty years.

This week, the series will focus on the North Country, which is home to more than a dozen state and federal prisons.

Corrections work has grown into one of the region's biggest and most controversial industries, providing thousands of high paying jobs, and anchoring the economies in towns from Malone to Moriah.

As part of our Prison Time Media Project, Brian Mann has a special report on how the North Country became a magnet for new prisons and how the industry is facing new scrutiny.  Go to full article
Franklin County legislator Billy Jones calls for action to stop the closure of Chateaugay Correctional Facility in his home town. Photo: Brian Mann
Franklin County legislator Billy Jones calls for action to stop the closure of Chateaugay Correctional Facility in his home town. Photo: Brian Mann

Another North Country town rallies to save its prison

This year, we're looking in-depth at the North Country's prison industry, how it grew into one of the region's top employers and how it's changing.

Over the weekend, hundreds of corrections officers, families, and elected officials gathered in Chateaugay in northern Franklin County.

They came to protest the latest round of state prison closures, now slated for 2014.

Four correctional facilities are on the chopping block, including two here in the North Country -- Mt. McGregor in Saratoga County and Chateaugay Correctional Facility.  Go to full article
Israel Keyes (top right) being interrogated by FBI investigators a few days before he committed suicide in 2012.  (Photo:  Screen capture of FBI video)
Israel Keyes (top right) being interrogated by FBI investigators a few days before he committed suicide in 2012. (Photo: Screen capture of FBI video)

Israel Keyes video shows cunning, remorseless killer

This month, the FBI made public more information about the serial killer Israel Keyes, whose murder spree included time in the North Country and Vermont. Authorities believe that Keyes' murder spree continued for more than a decade and left as many as 11 people dead before he was captured in March of 2012.

Keyes committed suicide in a jail cell in Alaska last December, leaving unanswered questions about most of his victims.

For the first time, the FBI has released hours of video tape from their interviews with Keyes. The video offers a terrifying portrait of a killer who felt no remorse, who at times seemed to be taunting investigators.  Go to full article
The  Rev. Oberia Dempsey campaigned early against drugs in Harlem. Photo: Wikipedia
The Rev. Oberia Dempsey campaigned early against drugs in Harlem. Photo: Wikipedia

Why did black leaders support America's drug war for so long?

This year, North Country Public Radio is looking in-depth at America's forty year long drug war. Tough-on-crime policies, sparked in part by New York's Rockefeller drug laws, changed the way we think about crime and justice and addiction. They also changed the North Country, as more and more prisons were built to house the swelling number of inmates.

This morning, our series continues with a look at how the drug war has been viewed within the African American community. Some black leaders see tough crime laws as racially biased and unfair. But many supporters of the drug war hoped that long prison sentences and harsh penalties would help clean up neighborhoods plagued by drugs.  Go to full article

1-10 of 48  next 10 »  last »