Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "rafting"

Long Lake teacher Becky Pelton spent three weeks in the Grand Canyon recently, along with her husband and six friends.   (photo: Becky Pelton)
Long Lake teacher Becky Pelton spent three weeks in the Grand Canyon recently, along with her husband and six friends. (photo: Becky Pelton)

Rafting, camping, dreaming in the Grand Canyon

We'll take a break from the cold and snow and listen as Adirondack teacher and rafter Becky Pelton talks about a recent trip on the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon. Pelton is Long Lake Central School's speech pathologist. She and her husband, Nate, also run the North Creek Rafting Company. They are avid rafters and paddlers. She kept a journal and blogged during the trip and will share photos and videos with Long Lake students and the community later this year.

Becky and Nate joined six friends on a 280-mile journey down the Colorado in late November and early December. Todd Moe spoke with Becky about the trip, which she described as a three-week trek at the bottom of the "Big Ditch", with lots of red sand, Great Blue Herons and rough rapids.  Go to full article
Basically, his argument is that people have the right to go down the Hudson River however they choose.

Questions persist for whitewater rafting company

The district attorney in Hamilton County has filed an application to reinstate criminal charges dating back to 2010 against Patrick Cunningham, operator of the Hudson River Rafting Company based in North Creek.

Just three weeks after the DA's action came the death of an Ohio woman who was a passenger in a raft guided by one of Cunningham's employees.

State police have charged the guide, Rory Fay of North Creek, with criminally negligent homicide for allegedly operating the raft while intoxicated.

Phil Brown is editor of the Adirondack Explorer magazine and he's been following this story closely. He joined Martha Foley on the line.  Go to full article

A Journey to Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, part 3

Alaska's arctic is a place of contrasts. For decades, the vast Prudhoe Bay oil fields have helped to feed the national economy. But the north slope also holds some of America's wildest--and most pristine--places. Brian Mann visited Alaska this summer. In this final part of his special series, Brian looks at two possible futures facing the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.  Go to full article

A Journey to Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, part 2

Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is one of the most remote places on earth. The tundra plain also holds one of the last great deposits of crude oil in North America. If oil development goes forward in the Refuge, it could affect caribou and polar bears. But drilling would also reshape the lives of people who live and travel in the Arctic. Brian Mann spent a month Alaska this summer.  Go to full article

A Journey to Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, part 1

After the terror attacks on September 11, the US House of Representatives voted to open Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil development. The plan is backed by President Bush, who says the oil would lessen America's reliance on the Middle East. The bill is stalled in the Senate. Democratic leaders say the measure would do little to foster energy independence. Many pro-environment groups claim that opening ANWR would destroy one of the world's great wilderness areas. Brian Mann traveled to the Arctic this summer and begins his special report.  Go to full article

1-5 of 5