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News stories tagged with "railroad"

Bill Branson is president of the Adirondack Railroad Preservation Society, which operates the Adirondack Scenic Railroad. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/people/39017545@N02/">Matt Johnson</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Bill Branson is president of the Adirondack Railroad Preservation Society, which operates the Adirondack Scenic Railroad. Photo: Matt Johnson, CC some rights reserved

Man at the heart of the Great Adirondack Railroad Debate

A group that wants to tear up an old railroad track in the Adirondack Park and replace it with a multi-use trail says it has gathered more than 10,000 signatures supporting the idea.

Adirondack Recreational Trail Advocates, known as ARTA, formed last year, reviving the debate over what should be done with the historic rail corridor that stretches from Old Forge to Lake Placid.  Go to full article
Clarke and Barbara Dunham have created miniature worlds, using model trains and tiny dioramas.  (Photo:  Andy Flynn)
Clarke and Barbara Dunham have created miniature worlds, using model trains and tiny dioramas. (Photo: Andy Flynn)

An imaginary world made of model trains

As we've been hearing, trains have become a flashpoint for debate in the Adirondacks. But in Pottersville, in Warren County, a Broadway set designer has opened the Adirondack Park's newest tourist attraction devoted entirely to model trains.

There's no controversy here. Just dozens of tiny trolleys, steam engines and locomotives, each surrounded by its own tiny world, sort of a Disneyland in miniature.

Clarke and Barbara Dunham brought "Railroads on Parade" to the North Country last year, after exhibiting it for years in New York City.  Go to full article
A caboose oil lamp from the NY Central Railroad
A caboose oil lamp from the NY Central Railroad

Adirondack Attic: antique railroad oil lamps

Our series, the Adirondack Attic, with Andy Flynn continues. You may know Andy from his series of "Adirondack Attic" books on local history. He uses the objects people make, use and leave behind to tell stories about the life and times of the region. Today, Andy and Saranac Lake railroad historian Chris Brescia compare two old caboose oil lamps.  Go to full article
View of the Floodwood Pond area from the tourist train
View of the Floodwood Pond area from the tourist train

Study raises pros and cons of scenic train

A new study released last night in Tupper Lake is raising questions about the future of the Adirondack Scenic Railroad.

The non-profit tourist train already carries thousands of passengers every year between Lake Placid and Saranac Lake.

The company hopes to expand that service soon to include the route to Tupper Lake.

But backers of the new report say state and local officials should also consider tearing up the tracks and building a multi-use trail for bicycles and snowmobiles.

Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
This money is being spent so a small group of obviously well-connected rail fans can run a tourist railroad...

Critic says DOT wasting money on scenic train

A Lake Placid snowmobile activist blasted state officials this week for spending millions on the tourism train connecting lake Placid and Saranac Lake, while road and bridge repairs go begging.

At a budget hearing in Albany, Jim McCulley challenged state Budget Director Robert Megna about the Department of Transportation's priorities. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article
John Larsen demonstrates Morse code at the Cumberland Heritage Village Museum in Ontario.
John Larsen demonstrates Morse code at the Cumberland Heritage Village Museum in Ontario.

Morse code in the age of IM

There's a certain allure to being fluent in languages or codes. John Larsen is a retired health administrator with fond memories of working as a telegrapher with Canadian Pacific Railway.These days he spends a lot of time demonstrating that increasingly rare skill with the Cumberland Telegraph Operator's Club. Most of the 58 members from Canada and the U.S. have some connection with real - or model - railroads. Morse code is still used by uncounted enthusiasts, such as HAM radio operators. But requirements for proficiency in Morse code are falling by the wayside. Larsen spoke with Lucy Martin about the significance Morse code once held - before the advent of telephones, radio or the Internet.  Go to full article

Preview: Hobofest 2009 in Saranac Lake

Music, stories, art and food are all part of "Hobofest 2009" in Saranac Lake on Sunday afternoon. The event will be held outside of 7444 Gallery on Depot Street. Artist Peter Seward tells Todd Moe that the event "embraces the railroad as a dormant resource" in the Adirondacks.  Go to full article

DOT official visits Tupper Lake train station

Local leaders in Tupper Lake are trading ideas for expanded train service with a top state transportation official from Albany. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article

Amtrak popularity climbs as gas prices rise

More people are riding the nation's passenger train system, Amtrak. It's to the point that mtrak doesn't have enough train car in some areas, and the trains are sold out. As Lester Graham reports, Amtrak has some other issues to sort out too.  Go to full article

Tupper Lake rail funding left out of budget

State officials have left out $5 million in funding that had been earmarked to expand the scenic railroad from Saranac Lake to Tupper Lake. New York's Transportation commissioner, Astrid Glynn, announced a twenty million dollar rail funding package yesterday. The spending plan does include subsidies for Amtrak service between Saratoga Springs and Rouses Point. As Jacob Resneck reports, state officials say the funding for Tupper Lake may be restored in future years.  Go to full article

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