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News stories tagged with "railroads"

Federal officials in the US have raised concerns about the type of tanker car that erupted in Lac Megantic since at least 1991.  Photo: Brian Mann
Federal officials in the US have raised concerns about the type of tanker car that erupted in Lac Megantic since at least 1991. Photo: Brian Mann

Train tanker cars that exploded in Lac Megantic "inadequate"

It's been nearly three months since an American-operated tanker train derailed and exploded in the town of Lac Megantic in eastern Quebec. The Montreal-Maine and Atlantic train was carrying a cargo of crude oil and other chemicals from oil fields in North Dakota. The massive explosions that followed killed forty-seven people.

In the weeks after the disaster, it has become clear that the clean-up and recovery effort in Lac-Megantic will be far more costly and challenging than once believed. Also, investigators in the US and Canada now acknowledge that there were deep concerns about the safety of the tanker cars used by the railroad.

Those fears first surfaced decades before this deadly accident occurred. Brian Mann has our special report.  Go to full article
Mose Ginsberg
Mose Ginsberg

Adirondack Attic: from peddler to Tupper Lake civic leader

We continue our series, the Adirondack Attic, with Andy Flynn. You may know Andy from his series of Adirondack Attic books on local history. He uses the objects people make, use and leave behind to tell stories about the life and times of the region. NCPR is collaborating with Andy and his sources at the Adirondack Museum and other historical associations and museums in the region to bring these stories to air.

Today, we'll listen to a 1969 interview with Tupper Lake business pioneer Mose Ginsberg, who immigrated to the Adirondacks in the 1890's as a teenager.  Go to full article
A miniature locomotive crosses Bob Meredith's handmade truss bridge. Photo: Todd Moe
A miniature locomotive crosses Bob Meredith's handmade truss bridge. Photo: Todd Moe

Heard Up North: more than a toy railroad

The logging railroads are gone and most of the sawmills in the northwestern Adirondacks have closed over the last century. But a group of model railroad buffs in Star Lake is building a miniature train exhibit that will explore the history of logging and life a hundred years ago.

Along with mountains, trees and houses, the minutely detailed diorama comes complete with Wanakena's historic foot bridge, Rich Lumber Company sawmills and even a steamboat named "Helen". Most of the exhibit is being built from scratch based on historic photos and memories. The finished layout will be permanently displayed in Star Lake.

Bob Meredith and Ted Tate donned their engineer caps and gave Todd Moe a tour of their miniature work-in-progress for today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article

Preview: "Hobofest" in Saranac Lake

The arrival of the Adirondack Scenic Railroad train on Sunday morning in Saranac Lake will kick off this year's Hobofest. The fourth annual all-day free music festival will include lots of music, both imported and local, and food for both lunch and dinner. Todd Moe spoke with artist Peter Seward, one of the organizers of the event.  Go to full article
<i>The Railroad</i> is the second novel in Holtzman's <i>Adirondack Trilogy</i>.
The Railroad is the second novel in Holtzman's Adirondack Trilogy.

Books: "Adirondack Trilogy" series

A long-time Adirondack summer resident is finishing up the third book in a series of novels about the history of the region. Tony Holtzman will talk about his Adirondack Trilogy at the Northwoods Inn in Lake Placid on Thursday night at 7 pm. Holtzman first visited the Adirondacks in the early 1950's, and after retiring from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 2002, he bought a cottage at the Bartlett Carry Club on Upper Saranac Lake.

Holtzman's first novel in the trilogy, Axton Landing, was published last year. His second book in the series, The Railroad, was released earlier this summer. The trilogy portrays life in the Adirondacks in the late 19th century and tackles topics such as the environment, land use, logging, railroads and tourism--topics that are still important today.

Todd Moe spoke with Holtzman about his novels and his love of the Adirondack Park.  Go to full article
Iowa Pacific hopes to haul millions of tons of tailings from the old Tahawus mine
Iowa Pacific hopes to haul millions of tons of tailings from the old Tahawus mine

Iowa Pacific wins fight to rebuild railroad into Adirondack Park

A Federal agency has given a Chicago-based company the green light to revive a 30-mile industrial railroad that stretches from North Creek to Newcomb. The track cuts through the Adirondack Park into the eastern High Peaks, one of the most popular destinations for hikers and campers.

Green groups opposed the project, arguing that the rail line violated protected forest preserve land. But as Brian Mann reports, they now say their fight to block the project is over.  Go to full article

Rail Line a Labor of Love

The governor announced this week that state will spend $40 million on upgrading rail lines. A third of that money will go to the North Country--some for short connector lines. One of those is the Batten Kill, in Washington County. The Batten Kill will receive $1 million for track rehabilitation. When Ronald Crowd took over the Batten Kill 20 years ago, it was nearly dead. Now he and his six employees run 40,000 tons of feed, fertilizer and logs along the 35 miles of track. The Batten Kill still hasn't turned a profit. And it's not just the business that's a challenge. Ron Crowd contracted polio when he was two. He uses a wheelchair. As he told Gregory Warner, that's where owning his own train comes in very handy.  Go to full article

Looking for Traces of Railroad History

The Adirondack Museum is planning an exhibit on the railroad worker. Who were the people who laid the tracks and ran the trains? Martha Foley talks with writer Amy Godine about her research for the upcoming exhibit.  Go to full article

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