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News stories tagged with "recreation"

Budget questions dog governor to Lake Placid

Gov. David Paterson was in Lake Placid yesterday for two "good news" events. He celebrated the Mt. Van Hoevenberg bobrun's long history, and signed an anti-DWI bill named after Olympian Jack Shea, who died in a crash with an alleged drunk driver eight years ago.

But state funding is crucial to the Olympic Regional Development Authority and the facilities it operates. So when the handshakes were all over, there were questions to answer. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article
Nancie Battaglia. Self portrait with Shea.
Nancie Battaglia. Self portrait with Shea.

A photographer's eye on the Vancouver Games

Photographer Nancie Battaglia is familiar to most of us as a talented all-around photographer, with an eye for both people and landscape. Her photographs regularly appear in Adirondack Life and other publications - including NCPR's book, Food, Stories, Life. But she came to Lake Placid to document the 1980 Winter Olympics... and Winter Olympics are still a sort of specialty.

Battaglia will be checking in with North Country Public Radio from the Vancouver Games. Martha Foley spoke with her this morning.  Go to full article
Bill Demong with his mom Helen
Bill Demong with his mom Helen

Bill Demong's Olympic journey: from Vermontville to Vancouver

This morning, we begin our week-long series previewing the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver. We'll look at Lake Placid's continuing Olympic legacy and we'll profile some of the athletes heading west to compete. In all, more than a dozen North Country competitors will take part in the Winter Olympics this year.

This morning, we begin with Brian Mann's story of Bill Demong, the Nordic combined skier from Vermontville.  Go to full article
Pay attention! Dogs were shown by professional handlers, as well as owners of all ages.
Pay attention! Dogs were shown by professional handlers, as well as owners of all ages.

A "real" dog and pony show in Ontario

Rural communities have a long tradition of fairs and special events. But volunteer fatigue hit the village of Kars, Ontario, this summer: no July fair, no parade, and no demolition derby. All was not lost, however. Lucy Martin found plenty to enjoy at a real dog and pony show.  Go to full article

Heard Up North: A Japanese card game in Massena

Go to the Massena Public Library on the first and third Saturdays of any month, and you'll find teenagers dueling, Yu Gi Oh style. Yu Gi Oh is a trading card game based on Japanese anime cartoons. It's like a Dungeons and Dragons for a new generation. James Roscha sponsors the regular tournaments. He and one of his Yu Gi Oh proteges are the subjects of today's Heard Up North. Sarah Minor produced this story.  Go to full article
The family game at the Osgoode Tournament: Miriam Brown (standing), Debbie Lewis, Heather Bellinger, Louis Gauthier and Leona Cameron. (photo by Lucy Martin)
The family game at the Osgoode Tournament: Miriam Brown (standing), Debbie Lewis, Heather Bellinger, Louis Gauthier and Leona Cameron. (photo by Lucy Martin)

Old time game makes a comeback

There's an old-time board game many Canadians remember like a childhood friend. Crokinole can be traced to back to Tavistock, Ontario in the mid 1870s. By the 1900s it was said to be among the most popular games in North America. The name comes from the French-Canadian word for cookie, which describes the stack of wooden disks used to boomerang across the board. Crokinole is typically played in groups of four, two to a team. Players sit around a big, rounded board with a stack of the disks, called buttons. They're aiming for a bull's eye sink-hole that's worth 20 points, shooting between barrier posts, and at or around other pieces, while staying out of the gutter. Ottawa Correspondent Lucy Martin recently dropped in on a local tournament at the Osgoode Township Museum.  Go to full article
A first taste of ice on the Mountfest climbing wall
A first taste of ice on the Mountfest climbing wall

Keene's Mountainfest revels in cold and ice

The cold snap that swept the North Country the last couple of weeks has caused a lot of grumbling. But for organizers of "Mountainfest" in Keene, the frosty temperatures and deep snow made for perfect conditions. Now in its thirteenth year, the gathering offered workshops and introductory classes over the weekend in mountaineering and backcountry skiing. Brian Mann sent this audio postcard.  Go to full article

Massive raceway resort takes baby step

Plans for a massive NASCAR-style raceway and resort complex in northern St. Lawrence County take a baby step forward tomorrow. The Brasher town board will consider zoning for the $108 million project, five years after it was first proposed. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Waymarkers in the forest (Photos:  Brian Mann)
Waymarkers in the forest (Photos: Brian Mann)

Solitude on the trail to Raquette Falls

The High Peaks offer some of the most dramatic and scenic back country skiing in the Northeast. But trails on the eastern side can be crowded, even a little congested, especially on busy holiday weekends. Brian Mann went for a solitary ski recently on the western side of the High Peaks, making the 8-mile round trip to Raquette Falls near Tupper Lake. Here's Brian's audio postcard.  Go to full article
Sheriff David Favro and NY Homeland Security chief Michael Balboni in Plattsburgh
Sheriff David Favro and NY Homeland Security chief Michael Balboni in Plattsburgh

Region plans tighter border security

Just days after a scathing Federal report found big gaps in security along the US-Canada border, a coalition of New York state, Quebec Provincial, and local officials from the North Country say they plan to step up their efforts to stop illegal traffic. New York State Homeland Security Secretary Michael Balboni held a meeting yesterday in Plattsburg. As Brian Mann reports, they say better communication is the first step.  Go to full article

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