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News stories tagged with "recycling"

Lenny Merculdi and Blake Putnam fill the "Bigfoot" with used plastics. Photo: David Sommerstein
Lenny Merculdi and Blake Putnam fill the "Bigfoot" with used plastics. Photo: David Sommerstein

Story 2.0: More farmers recycle ag plastics

Four years ago, state environmental officials made it illegal to burn trash and other waste anywhere in New York. That meant the end of the burn barrel, then a common sight across the countryside. Burn barrels were a major source of cancer-causing dioxin and other toxic chemicals in the air.

The burn ban also meant farmers could no longer burn the agricultural plastics that have become ubiquitous in farming. Trucking them to a landfill is the most common, but expensive, alternative. But more and more farmers are recycling them.

Our ongoing series, Story 2.0, checks back in on stories from the past.  Go to full article
Computer scrap. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/investingingold/7361098132">John Louis</a>, Creative COmmons, Some rights reserved
Computer scrap. Photo: John Louis, Creative COmmons, Some rights reserved

E-waste recycling up, but new standards needed

New York State has seen a boost in the volume of electronic waste being recycled since new legislation was introduced in 2011. The laws make manufacturers responsible for the recycling of their own products and bans disposals of consumer electronics in landfills.This means that recycling companies are doing well, but plans for national regulations remain stalled.  Go to full article
Edward and Linda MacDonald ran the popular seed-swap table at Ottawa's 20th "Seedy Saturday." Photo: Lucy Martin
Edward and Linda MacDonald ran the popular seed-swap table at Ottawa's 20th "Seedy Saturday." Photo: Lucy Martin

"Seed swaps" let gardeners share and explore

As gardeners look ahead to spring, some take advantage of what's called a "seed swap". It's a good way to recycle unwanted seeds, share a surplus, or take a chance on a few new varieties.

Ottawa's 20th "Seedy Saturday" took place March 2 in a community hall at Britannia Beach. The busy event featured educational booths and a number of regular seed vendors, plus workshops on saving seeds, permaculture and worm composting.  Go to full article
Computers ready for recycling in Olympia, WA. Photo: Bluedisk at en.wikipedia
Computers ready for recycling in Olympia, WA. Photo: Bluedisk at en.wikipedia

E-waste recycling: from bytes to bits and pieces

When the town of Canton opened a drop-off site this week for old electronics, it was not only giving St. Lawrence County residents a convenient way to dispose of unwanted TVs, computers, and cellphones, it was also helping them comply with the law.

This month marks the one-year anniversary of the New York State law that requires old electronics be recycled instead of simply thrown in the trash. Under the law, manufacturers have to collect and recycle the products they create when consumers are done with them. But a new report by the Natural Resources Defense Council finds the law is having mixed results.

Reporter Tracey Samuelson of New York Public Radio followed one discarded computer through the recycling process.  Go to full article
Canton Town Supervisor David Button, Town Clerk Lisa Hammond, Council member James Smith, and Highway Superintendent Terry Billings
Canton Town Supervisor David Button, Town Clerk Lisa Hammond, Council member James Smith, and Highway Superintendent Terry Billings

E-waste drop-off opens for St. Lawrence County residents

The town of Canton has opened a drop-off site for e-waste. St. Lawrence County residents can dispose of old computers, TVs, and cellphones at the town barn on Stiles Avenue. Julie Grant stopped by, to find out more about it.  Go to full article
The remains of hundreds of cars and other scrap metal. Photo: Tamara Keith
The remains of hundreds of cars and other scrap metal. Photo: Tamara Keith

Where do the "clunkers" go?

The federal Cash for Clunkers program kicked off this past weekend, and dealerships were pushing it hard to sell new cars. The program was created by Congress last month to give a boost to the struggling auto industry while helping the environment. The idea is to get older polluting cars off the road for good and replace them with new more-efficient ones. But what will happen to all the clunkers? Tamara Keith went to find out.  Go to full article
A volunteer stacks the bikes into a pile at the back of a huge shipping container. Photo: Karen Kelly
A volunteer stacks the bikes into a pile at the back of a huge shipping container. Photo: Karen Kelly

Bike shop in a box

So many of us have an old bike collecting dust in the garage. More often than not, they end up in the garbage. But, as Karen Kelly reports, one group has found a unique way to recycle them.  Go to full article

Turning the ski slopes green

Back in February, President Obama proposed $150 billion to employ people in "green collar jobs," The idea was to create jobs that benefited the environment. But he also wanted to boost the economy. A ski resort wanted to go one step ahead. So it hired a new employee to help its 2,500 acres "go green." Irene Noguchi reports.  Go to full article
Lenny Merculdi and Blake Putnam fill the "Bigfoot" with used plastics.
Lenny Merculdi and Blake Putnam fill the "Bigfoot" with used plastics.

Farmers test a new kind of baler for plastics

Farmers across New York State are bracing for a big change. It appears likely the Paterson administration will pass some form of a ban on open burning. That means farmers will have to find another way to dispose of the agricultural plastics that have become an indispensable part of the business. Clinton County is experimenting with one solution, a machine that crushes and bales the plastics so they can be recycled. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Drumming up a green outlook

It takes a keen eye to see the value in an old hubcap, a dented bucket or a broken bicycle horn. But when you're searching for musical instruments, the junkyard can be an inspiration. Karen Kelly has the story.  Go to full article

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