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News stories tagged with "reptiles"

From <em>Anatome Testudinis Europaeae</em> (1821) by Ludwig Heinrich Bojanus
From Anatome Testudinis Europaeae (1821) by Ludwig Heinrich Bojanus

Natural Selections: Turtle anatomy

Turtles breathe backwards; that is, when they relax their diaphragms, they inhale rather than exhale. Martha Foley and Curt Stager discuss the oddities of anatomy that arise from living in armor.  Go to full article
Snapping turtle crossing the road. Photo: Matt Foley (submitted to NCPR's Hurricane Irene album)
Snapping turtle crossing the road. Photo: Matt Foley (submitted to NCPR's Hurricane Irene album)

Natural Selections: Turtles

Snapping turtles aren't really that vicious, unless they are provoked. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about their peculiar anatomy, safe ways (for turtle and human) to help them across highways, and more.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Hognose snake

The Eastern hognose snake is better known by its nickname, puff adder, derived from its agressive display when disturbed. Its bite is mildly venomous, capable of sedating small prey, such as toads. Martha Foley and Curt Stager discuss this common northeastern reptile.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Rattlesnake Poison

Rattlesnakes and its other poisonous cousins in the US seem to be getting more toxic. Dr. Curt tells Martha Foley about one theory: that habitat loss and hunting pressure are reducing the average size and age of the reptiles, who have stronger venom when younger.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Adirondack snakes

A class asked Martha Foley and Curt Stager about the snakes of the region. There are about 10 indigenous species, only one poisonous. The most elusive is the worm snake, which looks like--and feeds on--its namesake.  Go to full article

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