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News stories tagged with "research"

Biologist Jonathan Hootman studies a long-eared bat
Biologist Jonathan Hootman studies a long-eared bat

Searching for bats in the forests of Fort Drum

Yesterday, we reported on the discovery of an endangered species that is complicating construction of much-needed housing on Fort Drum. Army officials want a management plan that allows development while preserving the habitat of the Indiana bat. But more information is needed on how the bats live, raise their pups and hibernate. Jonathan Brown tagged along with some biologists as they went out one night to catch some bats.  Go to full article
Researcher Heather Root goes to work (Source: H. Root)
Researcher Heather Root goes to work (Source: H. Root)

Researcher Finds New Mite Species in Adks

A researcher from the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry has discovered a brand new species living in the Adirondacks. Heather Root, who grew up in Essex, Vermont, found at least one new type of tiny tree mite in the maple tree canopy at the Huntington Wildlife Forest near Newcomb. Root presented her discovery last month at the Ninth Annual Northeast Natural History Conference in Albany. Root did her research while dangling in a harness high above the ground. She told Brian Mann that she also found rare forms of lichen, not seen in the Adirondacks for decades.  Go to full article

Clarkson Cited for Hazardous Waste Violations

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is fining Clarkson University more than $60,000 for alleged hazardous waste violations. The EPA filed the complaint yesterday. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
A researcher, her turtle net, and her turtle-tracking antenna
A researcher, her turtle net, and her turtle-tracking antenna

Saving Turtles From Traffic

Driving in the North Country can sometimes be like navigating an obstacle course of wildlife -- deer, skunks, raccoons, frogs, and throughout much of the summer, turtles. Turtles like to lay their eggs along roadsides and become easy candidates for roadkill. Turtles live and reproduce for decades, some more than 60 years. When an adult is killed prematurely, it can have a big effect on turtle populations. Researchers at Clarkson University are trying to find out how often turtles cross the road and how to help them get safely to the other side. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

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