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News stories tagged with "resort"

Lead developer Tom Lawson (R) with Tupper Lake town supervisor Roger Amell (L, seated) at a political gathering last week. Photo: Brian Mann
Lead developer Tom Lawson (R) with Tupper Lake town supervisor Roger Amell (L, seated) at a political gathering last week. Photo: Brian Mann

Big Tupper resort an election year issue

The Adirondack Club and Resort proposed for Tupper Lake has been delayed by a lawsuit filed by two environmental advocacy groups, and the case is now being reviewed by judges in Albany. But with election day less than a month away, the future of the resort is also on the agendas of politicians.

There appears to be bipartisan support for the development, which has been on the drawing board for nearly a decade.  Go to full article
Bill Mozdzier and Jim LaValley work to get Chair 2 ready for opening day in 2009. ARISE now says the ski hill will close. Photo: Brian Mann
Bill Mozdzier and Jim LaValley work to get Chair 2 ready for opening day in 2009. ARISE now says the ski hill will close. Photo: Brian Mann

Big Tupper ski area to close

A local group that organized in 2009 to reopen Big Tupper Ski Area and to advocate for development of the Adirondack Club and Resort says the popular local destination will not reopen this year.

The group, called ARISE, operated the mountain on a volunteer basis, while waiting for a new resort destination to be built in Tupper Lake.

The group struggled last year because of the warm, snowless winter.  Go to full article
Developers Michael Foxman (left) and Tom Lawson (right) accuse environmental activists of waging a "war of attrition" against their project. Photo: Mark Kurtz
Developers Michael Foxman (left) and Tom Lawson (right) accuse environmental activists of waging a "war of attrition" against their project. Photo: Mark Kurtz

Green groups raise new challenge to Tupper Lake resort

State officials are rejecting a claim by two environmental groups that permits for the new resort in Tupper Lake are invalid because developers failed to meet a deadline for satisfying permit conditions.

On Monday, Protect the Adirondacks and the Sierra Club issued a letter arguing that a six-month grace period had expired in July, requiring developers to begin the permitting process again.

But in a statement, Adirondack Park Agency spokesman Keith McKeever said that the resort has a "ten year tie period" to complete requirements.  Go to full article
Green groups say the APA permits for the Big Tupper resort violated environmental rules, but state officials and the developers are defending the process (PHOTOS:  Brian Mann)
Green groups say the APA permits for the Big Tupper resort violated environmental rules, but state officials and the developers are defending the process (PHOTOS: Brian Mann)

Adirondack Club and Resort lawsuit moves forward

In March, two environmental groups and a small number of landowners sued the state of New York, hoping to invalidate permits allowing construction of the Adirondack Club and Resort in Tupper Lake. Green groups argued that the Adirondack Park Agency had failed to enforce key regulations designed to protect open space in the Park.

The lawsuit has been moving forward, with all sides filing legal briefs with the state Supreme Court. Brian Mann spoke about the latest developments with Martha Foley.  Go to full article
Tupper Lake village Mayor Paul Maroun. Photo: Brian Mann
Tupper Lake village Mayor Paul Maroun. Photo: Brian Mann

Tupper Lake Mayor champions resort, but still has big questions

Thursday in Ray Brook, the Adirondack Park Agency resumes deliberations over the huge resort proposed for Tupper Lake. Developers hope to build more than seven hundred homes, mansions and condos over the next fifteen years.

A final vote on the precedent-setting project is scheduled for January. The debate over the Big Tupper resort has drawn national attention and it's also reshaped life and local politics in Tupper Lake.

Brian Mann sat down to talk with Paul Maroun who was elected mayor in November after campaigning on a platform of full support for the development. Maroun says he still has questions about how the project will be financed and when it will move forward. But he thinks the resort will revitalize his town's economy.  Go to full article
Big Tupper developer Tom Lawson says he hopes to break ground immediately (NCPR file photo)
Big Tupper developer Tom Lawson says he hopes to break ground immediately (NCPR file photo)

Big questions linger about Big Tupper biz plan

On Friday, the Adirondack Park Agency commission delved deep into the business plan for the proposed Adirondack Club and Resort. The APA will vote in January on whether to approve the massive project, which supporters hope will revitalize the economy in Tupper Lake. The development has been on the drawing table for years, with more than seven hundred condos and mansions, along with a marina, equestrian center and modern ski hill.

One part of the Park Agency's review involves determining whether the project will have negative economic impacts on the community. As Brian Mann reports, that effort is complicated by the fact that there are still a lot of unanswered questions about how the resort will be financed and built.  Go to full article
Last week's ACR hearing was held in the Tupper Lake train depot (Photo:  Brian Mann)
Last week's ACR hearing was held in the Tupper Lake train depot (Photo: Brian Mann)

Experts debate viability, business plan of proposed Big Tupper resort

In Tupper Lake, the latest round of hearings into the proposed Adirondack Club and Resort has been focusing on economic questions about the project. Developers Michael Foxman and Tom Lawson hope to build hundreds of condos and mansions, along with a new ski area, marina, equestrian center and other amenities. The price tag for the project is roughly $500 million.

Some business leaders in the village say they're satisfied that the company has laid out a realistic plan for building the expansive resort. But some resort experts, state officials, and local government leaders in Tupper Lake say they still have questions about how the project will be financed and how enough buyers will be found for the new homes. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
Despite years of haggling, the number of issues that will need to be resolved during the final round of hearings has actually grown.

Debate, negotiations over Big Tupper resort leaves parties polarized

After years of public review, town hall meetings, mediation sessions and negotiations, the Adirondack Club and Resort project is entering its final phase.

An adjudicatory hearing will begin soon, possibly as early as next month, overseen by administrative law judge Daniel O'Connell.

When that hearing is finished, the Adirondack Park Agency will have sixty days to vote on whether the 600-unit resort should be given a permit or not.

But as Brian Mann reports, the various factions taking part in the hearing are still as deeply divided over key issues as they were half a decade ago.  Go to full article
Arthur Lussi (Source:  APA website)
Arthur Lussi (Source: APA website)

Local town official accuses Park Agency, commissioner of unethical conduct

A local government official in North Elba is accusing the Adirondack Park Agency and one of its commissioners, Arthur Lussi, of unethical conduct. Lussi is partnering with Verizon to build a new cell phone tower on top of the Crowne Plaza hotel in Lake Placid.

Now, a member of North Elba's planning and zoning board says Lussi and members of the APA staff tried to manipulate local review of the project.

As Brian Mann reports, the Park Agency says the case was handled properly, despite confusion and miscommunications between state and town officials.

Clarification: The proposed cell tower structure described in this story would be 56 feet high from the ground to peak elevation. The height above the existing roof line would be approximately 20 feet.  Go to full article
Prospectus map from Front Street Mountain Development showing resort concept (Source: Front Street)
Prospectus map from Front Street Mountain Development showing resort concept (Source: Front Street)

Town "struggles" with North Creek resort

Two years ago, the Adirondack Park Agency approved a massive new resort in North Creek. Front Street Mountain Development was meant to bring more than 130 luxury condos to the village, along with five hotels, restaurants and a riding stable. The idea was to tie the resort in with the North Creek ski bowl, offering ski-from-your door condominiums.

But so far, only one model home has been built and no properties in the resort have been sold. As Brian Mann reports, local officials are questioning the project's future.  Go to full article

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