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News stories tagged with "river"

Boats sit along the Erie Canal in Fairport, NY. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/jstephenconn/2793824699/">J. Stephen Conn</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Boats sit along the Erie Canal in Fairport, NY. Photo: J. Stephen Conn, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

NYS canals expect 20-year high in commercial traffic

While often seen as an economic lifeline of another era, New York's canals are poised to have a big year for moving freight; almost two centuries after goods were first transported on the upstate New York waterway.

As the state's network of canals opens this week for its 189th official season, commercial traffic along the waterways is expected to be at a two-decade high.

The Canal Corporation, the agency that oversees the 524 miles of canals, expects more than 100,000 tons of freight to move through upstate by way of the Erie Canal and its other canals.  Go to full article
The Croghan Island Mill  Photo: David Sommerstein
The Croghan Island Mill Photo: David Sommerstein

Croghan dam reclassified as "low risk"

People working to save the small, historic dam in Croghan from demolition recently got something of a reprieve. The state Department of Environmental Conservation has reclassified the old concrete dam. The two-part structure on the Beaver River was previously listed as "high risk", that could cause death and serious damage if it breached. After the assessment, however, the dam is now considered a low risk structure.  Go to full article
Photo: American Carp Society
Photo: American Carp Society

The Ins & Outs of Carp Fishing

Many anglers consider carp the mucky, ugly bottom-feeders of the fish world in this country. But in Great Britain and Europe, carp are prized fighters and millions of anglers fish day and night to haul in a trophy catch. The World Carp Championship kicks off today on the St. Lawrence River near Waddington and runs through next week. Hundreds of anglers will compete from more than 20 countries. David Sommerstein spent time with a carp guide and a British angler to find out what carp fishing's all about. This story first aired in 2003.  Go to full article
Rushton's tent at the 1886 American Canoe Association meet at Grindstone Island on the St Lawrence River.
Rushton's tent at the 1886 American Canoe Association meet at Grindstone Island on the St Lawrence River.

Preview: "Paddling to Perfection" in Canton

The new exhibit, Paddling to Perfection, opens at noon today at the St. Lawrence County Historical Association as part of the weekend celebration of the 50th Anniversary Rushton Canoe Races in Canton. Boatbuilder J Henry Rushton built his first boat, a canoe, at his Canton boat shop in 1873. Within ten years, his boats, canoes and paddles were on display at world's fairs and expos.

The new exhibit explores Rushton's involvement with the American Canoe Association meet in 1886 at Grindstone Island on the St. Lawrence River and Rushton's award winning canoes at the 1893 Columbian World Exposition in Chicago. St. Lawrence County historian Trent Trulock told Todd Moe that the "Paddling to Perfection" exhibit includes photographs, books, and artifacts related to these two events.  Go to full article
An image from Dave Beck's "Logjam" 3D animation.
An image from Dave Beck's "Logjam" 3D animation.

Art that explores a river, infinity and new ideas

A Clarkson University artist spent this summer in Minnesota studying a river, the logging industry and the human element. Dave Beck directs the Digital Arts and Sciences Program at Clarkson University. His new show, titled "Continuation," includes sculpture, video and a 20-foot tall projected 3D animation. Beck was an artist-in-residence at the Science Museum of Minnesota and worked with biologists and park rangers to gather images, video and data on the St. Croix River. But he says the exhibit also connects with his hiking and paddling experiences in the Adirondacks. The show opens Thursday in the Gibson Gallery at SUNY-Potsdam. Todd Moe toured the exhibit with Beck and gallery director April Vasher-Dean.  Go to full article
Our intrepid Adirondack Bureau Chief Brian Mann working hard on the Ausasble River.  (Photo:  Allen Mann)
Our intrepid Adirondack Bureau Chief Brian Mann working hard on the Ausasble River. (Photo: Allen Mann)

A summer day cool-off through Ausable Chasm

This week we're celebrating summer by getting outdoors in the North Country. Yesterday Brian Mann reported on the fight over paddling rights and private property in the Adirondacks.

This morning, we go back to Ausable Chasm, a remarkable sandstone canyon in the town of Keeseville. The Ausable River squeezes through this narrow, high-walled valley of rock just before it flows into Lake Champlain. The privately-owned site has been a popular tourist attraction for more than a century. Brian Mann visited recently and sent this audio postcard.  Go to full article
Andy Schrader stands on his dock on the bank of the Salmon River (Photos:  Brian Mann)
Andy Schrader stands on his dock on the bank of the Salmon River (Photos: Brian Mann)

On the Salmon River, a time of healing or an eco-disaster?

This summer, a private contractor ripped out a century-old dam on the Salmon River in northern Franklin County. State officials said the structure was deteriorating and posed a safety hazard. The town of Fort Covington decided to remove the dam, rather than pay for costly repairs. Green groups say the project will eventually restore crucial fish and bird habitat. But two months after the work was done, a massive plug of silt and sand still clogs the river. As Brian Mann reports, many locals worry that the Salmon River could be permanently damaged.  Go to full article
The construction site of the new hydropower plant on the Raquette river.
The construction site of the new hydropower plant on the Raquette river.

Fingers crossed, Potsdam harnesses Raquette's power

We're all shivering from the arctic cold, but village of Potsdam officials aren't complaining. Half of the Raquette River is being diverted as workers build a second hydroelectric plant in the village. The four megawatt project will bring the village new revenue and green energy when it goes online next summer. But officials worry another thaw could interfere with the project. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
The wild Rupert River is already straddled by distribution lines
The wild Rupert River is already straddled by distribution lines

Electricity bound for NY, VT comes at a cost for the Cree

Beginning today, North Country Public Radio will air a series of special reports about a part of the world that feels very remote: the Cree Indian territory in northern Canada.

Back in the 1990s, New York's then-governor, Mario Cuomo, canceled a $15 billion deal to buy hydroelectric power from Quebec. That move effectively killed a project that would have built a network of dams and reservoirs along the Great Whale River, near James Bay. That was a victory for the Cree and for their allies in the environmental community. But now Hydro-Quebec is moving forward with a new project that will uproot and rechannel another northern river. Supporters say it's an engineering feat that rivals the Trans-Alaska pipeline, one that will supply cheap, carbon-free electricity to consumers in New York state and Vermont. As Brian Mann reports, the Rupert River is sacred to the Cree who live nearby.  Go to full article

Heard up North: Haws, We Gotch Ye

In their weekly series on North Country place names, Dale Hobson and Gregory Warner discuss a bogus origin for the name "Oswegatchie" as well as the truth... we also hear from Chris Angus, editor of "Oswegatchie: A North Country River".  Go to full article

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