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News stories tagged with "rivers"

Whitewater slalom world champion Scott Shipley. Photo courtesy S2O Designs.
Whitewater slalom world champion Scott Shipley. Photo courtesy S2O Designs.

Kayaking champion helps design whitewater parks in Canton, Potsdam

The country's best known whitewater kayaking champion is helping design whitewater courses in Canton and Potsdam. Three time World Cup winner and three time Olympian Scott Shipley met with community members Monday night.  Go to full article
Congklingville Dam on Great Sacandaga Lake. Photo via <a href="http://www.hrbrrd.com/"> Hudson River-Black River Regulating District</a>
Congklingville Dam on Great Sacandaga Lake. Photo via Hudson River-Black River Regulating District

North Country counties settle flood control fight

A multimillion dollar legal battle that simmered for half a decade in the North Country is finally winding to a close.

Four counties - including Albany, Rensselaer, Warren, and Washington - have agreed to settle a dispute with the Hudson River Black River Regulating district over who should pay for flood control efforts.  Go to full article
View from the bluffs above Lows Lake. Source: NYSDEC
View from the bluffs above Lows Lake. Source: NYSDEC

Green groups win Lows Lake legal fight, Park precedent unclear

New York state officials have decided to drop their appeal of a lawsuit filed by environmental groups over the management of Lows Lake, a popular paddling destination in the Adirondack Park. The Adirondack Mountain Club and Protect the Adirondacks have fought for years to have the lake itself, including the water and lake bed, classified as wilderness.

Earlier this month, the Adirondack Park Agency and the Department of Environmental Conservation decided to accept that designation. As Brian Mann reports, it's unclear how this legal victory for environmentalists will affect other lakes and rivers in the Adirondacks.  Go to full article
Flood waters hit Tupper Lake. Photo: Jim Bission, Piercefield
Flood waters hit Tupper Lake. Photo: Jim Bission, Piercefield

Year of the Floods Part One: The Rivers Rise

During this membership drive week, we'll be looking back at the one big story that shaped much of our news coverage over the last twelve months, a series we're calling The Year of the Floods.

It's a story with two major chapters. Communities are still picking up the pieces from horrific flash floods in late August. But all that came AFTER what was the first record-setting flooding of 2011.

Beginning in April, torrential rains combined with heavy snowmelt, sparking weeks of flooding that caused tens of millions of dollars worth of damages. In part one of our series, Brian Mann looks at the historic rise of rivers last spring that triggered emergencies from Potsdam to Port Henry.  Go to full article
Matt Foley checks the meters at his power plant in Wadhams, NY (Photos:  Brian Mann)
Matt Foley checks the meters at his power plant in Wadhams, NY (Photos: Brian Mann)

Electricity glut threatens North Country's green power industry

Yesterday, we reported on New York's growing reliance on electricity produced Canada. A new project now in the works would pipe enough energy from hydro dams in Quebec to power a million homes in New York City.

The North Country has also seen a boom in energy production in recent years, with new wind farms, wood pellet plants, and biomass. But with more and more competition, and the lingering economic downturn, electric rates have plummeted.

That's putting pressure on small-scale producers of electricity, including companies trying to generate green, carbon-free energy. A biomass plant in Chateaugay, in Clinton County, laid off 13 workers last month. And many of the region's small hydro dams are also struggling.

This morning, Brian Mann profiles one dam operator in the Adirondacks who says without big regulatory changes, some green energy producers won't survive.  Go to full article
The view from the top of Roaring Brook falls. Photos: Brian Mann
The view from the top of Roaring Brook falls. Photos: Brian Mann

Short trail, big views at Roaring Brook Falls

It's been a wet, warm December and that's tough news for skiers and snowshoers. But the long autumn has extended the hiking season. So Brian Mann set off last week to explore the trail to Roaring Brook Falls just outside of Keene Valley.

It's one of the shortest, easiest hiking trails in the Adirondacks, and the pay-off in views and scenery may be one of the most spectacular. Here's Brian's audio postcard.  Go to full article
Rupert River diversion was a massive industrial project rooted in Quebec's wilderness (Photo:  Brian Mann)
Rupert River diversion was a massive industrial project rooted in Quebec's wilderness (Photo: Brian Mann)

As Northeast looks to Hydro Quebec for power, thorny environmental questions remain

Northeast states are increasingly looking to Canada to meet a growing demand for low cost hydro electricity from renewable sources.

But the energy imports are stirring controversy. In northern New Hampshire, local activists are fighting a power line that would send the electricity south. And questions are being raised about whether big hydro is really green.

As part of a collaboration of Northeast stations John Dillon of Vermont Public Radio reports.

Northeast environmental reporting is made possible, in part, by a grant from United Technologies. Northeast environmental coverage is part of NPR's Local News Initiative.  Go to full article

DEC offers ice safety tips

With winter in full swing, officials with the state Department of Environmental Conservation are reminding outdoor enthusiasts to be cautious on lakes and rivers.

Hiking, snowshoeing, skiing, and snowmobiling on frozen lakes and ponds are among the many winter delights enjoyed by residents and visitors of the Adirondack Park. Chris Morris offers some tips on how to be safe on the ice this winter.  Go to full article

Head of North Country's embattled dam and reservoir system steps down

The head of one of the most embattled state organizations in the North Country has stepped down. Glenn LaFave, who ran the Hudson River Black River Regulating District, left the organization last Wednesday after four years on the job.

As Brian Mann reports, he departs as the District's future is in doubt because of a debt crisis and a series of court challenges.  Go to full article

Is "rock snot" the next invasive species threat in the Adks?

Researchers say the invasive algae didymo, widely called "rock snot," is spreading throughout Vermont and the Lake Champlain basin. Found last week east of Burlington, the algae could make its way into Adirondack waterways, and once it establishes a presence, it's just about impossible to control or eradicate. Scientists say the algae forms large mats along the bottom of waterways and chokes out native plants. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article

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