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News stories tagged with "rural"

Listen: Vermont's Pete Sutherland makes rural music, with kids

Just in time for the growing season, a new album filled with songs about gardening and rural life. Vermont folk singer/songwriter Pete Sutherland is best known as a member of the Clayfoot Strutters and Pete's Posse, and collaborating with young musicians at schools across northern Vermont. For years, Sutherland has been an artist-in-residence in schools, sharing old and new ballads and helping students shape family and community stories into songs. He'll lead a group of young Vermont musicians on an exchange trip to Northumberland, England, later this month.

Todd Moe talks with Pete about his latest album, "Farmland", which includes ten favorites from his collection of music created with the help of two youth advocacy organizations, the Young Vermont Singers and Young Tradition Vermont.  Go to full article
You'll find horses, axes, logs and more on Saturday during the Adirondack Rural Skills and Homesteading Festival at the Paul Smiths VIC.  Photo: Brett McLeod
You'll find horses, axes, logs and more on Saturday during the Adirondack Rural Skills and Homesteading Festival at the Paul Smiths VIC. Photo: Brett McLeod

Learning rural "lost arts" at the Paul Smiths VIC

NCPR is media sponsor for the Adirondack Rural Skills and Homesteading Festival this Saturday (10-to-4) at the Paul Smiths VIC. Exhibitions will include logging and farming with horses, and competitive lumberjack sports with the Paul Smiths College Woodsmen's Team. Workshops range from canning and cider making to wood working and small-scale farming. Paul Smiths College professor Brett McLeod calls these "lost arts", and he told Todd Moe that the event is all about learning from past generations.  Go to full article
U.S. Rep. Bill Owens (D-Plattsburgh)
U.S. Rep. Bill Owens (D-Plattsburgh)

Owens: rural America losing clout in farm policy

Lawmakers and agricultural leaders are searching for a way forward after the Farm Bill went down in flames in the House last week.

Many Republicans bristled at the nearly $100 billion a year price tag. About 80 percent of that is the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP -- better known as Food Stamps. Some Democrats voted no to protest of cuts to that program. In the end, the farm bill went down by a significant margin, even though GOP House Speaker John Boehner voted for it.

It's unclear if the House will take up the Senate's version - which passed earlier this month - or seek to extend the 2008 farm bill for another year.  Go to full article
EJ Noble Hospital's new CEO Marlinda LaValley, and new board chair Michael Burgess. Photo: Julie Grant
EJ Noble Hospital's new CEO Marlinda LaValley, and new board chair Michael Burgess. Photo: Julie Grant

EJ Noble Hospital: 'We're open for business'

E.J. Noble Hospital in Gouverneur has had a tough year. Last fall, the State Department of Health forced it to close down, after finding numerous safety violations in the hospital lab.

Most of the problems have been corrected. The hospital has new management and a new board of directors. Now it needs the patients to return.  Go to full article
New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg promised to be a partner to the state. Photo: Karen DeWitt
New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg promised to be a partner to the state. Photo: Karen DeWitt

NYC a partner, upstate cities want help

Mayors from across the state came to the Capitol to testify to a joint legislative fiscal committee on Governor Cuomo's proposed budget. While New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg went out of his way to offer support to the governor and for his budget plan, upstate mayors cities begged for a bail out.  Go to full article

Rural jobs program looks to doctors and nurses

President Obama unveiled a new jobs initiative for rural America last week. Not targeting roads and bridges, but doctors and nurses. The Innovation Trail's Marie Cusick explains why federal officials believe more doctors could be good medicine for struggling rural economies.  Go to full article
U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack
U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack

Agriculture secretary addresses 'silent crisis' in rural America

Last week, President Obama turned his attention to rural America. He visited an ethanol refinery in Missouri, a small CSA farmer in Iowa, and wind turbine blades manufacturer in Iowa. The message was that while farming is important to rural communities, most rural people get their paychecks off the farm. New industries like renewable energies will be key to reviving small towns.

On Air Force One, Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack said that rural America is facing "a silent crisis." David Sommerstein got a chance to interview Vilsack to ask what he meant. Vilsack says the recession hit rural America decades ago. He says 90% of counties with persistent poverty are in rural areas.  Go to full article
Albany <em>Times-Union</em> political reporter Jimmy Vielkind says rural Democrats are "hopeful" about their chances in November
Albany Times-Union political reporter Jimmy Vielkind says rural Democrats are "hopeful" about their chances in November

NY Dems meet in Niagara Falls to hash out rural issues, strategies

Over the weekend, Democrats from around New York state gathered in Niagara Falls to talk about rural issues. They face some tough fights in November's elections, as they work to defend state Senate and US congressional seats.

Jimmy Vielkind is a political reporter for the Albany Times Union and he was at the conference. He spoke with Brian Mann.

Note: Winning the Democratic rural conference straw poll doesn't mean that Attorney General Andrew Cuomo is an official candidate for governor. He has yet to declare that he's running for the office in November.  Go to full article

Statistics show the North Country is about average for non-metro New York State

A new analysis from Cornell University's Community and Rural Development Institute puts the North Country (socio-economically speaking) right in the ballpark of the rest non-metropolitan New York State.

The report is based on county level U.S. Census data. With some variations county to county, the region including Lewis, Jefferson, St. Lawrence, Franklin, Clinton, Essex and Hamilton counties has comparable employment and poverty rates, household incomes, housing values and so on when compared to the rest of rural New York.

That'll surprise many people who live and work in the region. It surprised the researchers, according to the institute's co-director, Dr. David Brown. He is in Canton today as keynote speaker for the annual North Country Symposium at St. Lawrence University. He talked this morning with Martha Foley.  Go to full article

A follow-up on Washington's prescriptions for health care reform

A new Associated Press poll suggests Americans hold a widely shared conviction that major health care changes are needed. But they're virtually split down the middle on whether health care plans being discussed in Congress are the right way to go. The poll suggests Americans are worried that the fine print could cost them money, and that opponents have stronger feelings on the issue than do supporters. In May, Martha Foley spoke with David Acker, CEO of Canton Potsdam Hospital, about how the health care reform conversation was shaping up for small hospitals, in rural areas like the North Country. He was back in the studio this morning, for a follow-up conversation.  Go to full article

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