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News stories tagged with "russia"

NPR East Africa correspondent Gregory Warner, one-time NCPR host of "All Before Five." Photo: Pearl Gabel/NPR
NPR East Africa correspondent Gregory Warner, one-time NCPR host of "All Before Five." Photo: Pearl Gabel/NPR

Gregory Warner: there's no word in Russian to describe who he works for

The first story listed in the NCPR archive from Gregory Warner dates to April 2005. He came to the station to help us develop afternoon news, and host All Things Considered. Perhaps you remember his occasional impromptu accordion breaks during ATC? We do! Gregory moved on from NCPR after a couple years and many, many creative, touching, humorous, and vivid stories from across this region.

After freelancing from conflict zones in Afghanistan, Pakistan, the Congo, and a stint as senior reporter for APM's Marketplace, he's sort of settled down. Gregory's now NPR's East Africa correspondent, based in Kenya, and we hear his reporting from all over a region of the world that's experiencing tremendous economic growth, and a rising threat of global terrorism. His stories are still vivid, touching, and engaging, and he continues to find the surprising, human stories behind the news of the day.

Martha Foley caught up with Gregory this morning at his home base in Nairobi, via Skype. He's just back from assignments in Rwanda, covering the anniversary of the genocide there 20 years ago, and Ukraine, where he was one of the first NPR reporters on the ground as Russia consolidated its control over Crimea.  Go to full article
Celia Evans, lower right, teaches Russian students some of her favorite songs. Photo: Celia Evans
Celia Evans, lower right, teaches Russian students some of her favorite songs. Photo: Celia Evans

Teaching and learning in Siberia

This fall, an ecology professor at Paul Smiths College traveled thousands of miles to learn about a new culture, and share a bit about life in the Adirondacks. Celia Evans was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to teach and conduct research in Siberia. She, and her two daughters, spent three months in Russia's Altai Republic studying primary school students' relationships to their environment, community and culture.

Evans, who also shared her love of folk music with her Russian hosts, told Todd Moe that she also wanted to find out how students in Siberia are learning about their natural world compared with students in the North Country.  Go to full article

Books: "Captured by the Russians"

St. Lawrence University alum Charles Burrall returns to campus to sign copies of his book, Captured by the Russians -- A True Story on Saturday. Burrall told Todd Moe that today he lives a relatively quiet life as a school teacher in Maryland. But it wasn't always so. In 1984, he was a crew member on a small ship off the coast of Alaska that was seized by the Soviet Union. Burrall told Todd about his eight-day confinement, relations with his captors and how faith helped play a part in his eventual release. He'll sign copies of his book Saturday, 2-4 pm at the Brewer Bookstore in Canton.  Go to full article
The Altai Republic is situated in the very center of Asia at the junction of Kazakhstan and Mongolia. Forests cover about 25% of the region.
The Altai Republic is situated in the very center of Asia at the junction of Kazakhstan and Mongolia. Forests cover about 25% of the region.

Adirondackers train Russian park staff

Earlier this fall, three Adirondack women traveled to a Russian province to assist with training on wilderness ethics and stewardship. Adirondack Mountain Club's education director, Jen Kretser, Paul Smith's College professor Karen Boldis and ADK employee Julia Goren visited the Siberian province of Altai Republic. The region has looked to the Adirondacks as a land-use model. The women helped train Altai Nature Park staff, nonprofit groups and tour operators as part of an exchange program. Achieving balance between environmental protection and economic development is a strong focus of the Altai Assistance Project. Todd Moe spoke with Jen Kretser about the September trip.  Go to full article
Born Sept. 25, 1906, Shostakovich is considered one of the most important figures in 20th-century music
Born Sept. 25, 1906, Shostakovich is considered one of the most important figures in 20th-century music

Preview: Shostakovich Festival

The North Country will have the opportunity to join the worldwide centennial celebration of the birth of the famous composer Dmitri Shostakovich with "A Shostakovich Festival: A Centennial Celebration of Soviet Russia's Greatest Composer", presented jointly by SUNY Potsdam's Crane School of Music and St. Lawrence University. Todd Moe has a preview.  Go to full article
Russian stamp features the Altai region
Russian stamp features the Altai region

Adirondackers will train Russian park staff

Three Adirondack women travel to a Russian province Sunday for two weeks to assist with training on wilderness ethics and stewardship. Adirondack Mountain Club's education director, Jen Kretser, Paul Smith's College professor Karen Boldis and ADK employee Julia Goren will visit the Siberian province of Altai Republic from September 3-17. Susan Cutting of the Altai Project in New Hampshire will join them. The Altai Republic has looked to the Adirondacks as a land-use model. The four women will help train Altai Nature Park staff, nonprofit groups and tour operators. Todd Moe spoke with Julia Goren and Jen Kretser about the trip.  Go to full article

Adk Arts Activist Takes Lessons To Lake Baikal

Arts activist and organizer Naj Wikoff, from Keene Valley, returned this week from a year in Russia. He lived near Lake Baikal, helping hospitals and other community groups develop arts programs. Wikoff says he used lessons learned here in the North Country to inspire projects and partnerships in rural Russia.  Go to full article
Building the stupa
Building the stupa

Building A Buddhist Stupa on the Russian Steppe

Naj Wikoff from Keene Valley is spending a year in Ulan Udea, in Russia's Lake Baikal region, developing arts programs at a government hospital. He's has been keeping an on-line journal on NCPR's website and sending occasional audio diaries. This week, Naj describes a village's effort to rebuild a sacred Buddhist shrine, called a stupa, in a small village on the edge of Siberia. Buddhists were persecuted during by the communist regime, especially during the Stalin era in the 1950s. But over the last decade, the religion has experienced a renaissance. The new stupa will serve as a place of worship and pilgrimage to honor the 12th reincarnation of the Khambo Lama.  Go to full article
A misty bay on Lake Baikal
A misty bay on Lake Baikal

Audio Diary: From Keene Valley to Lake Baikal

Naj Wikoff, from Keene Valley, is spending eight months in Ulan Ade, in the Lake Baikal region of eastern Russia. Since August, Naj has been keeping a web-diary of his journey here at NCPR.org. He's described his travels and his work as a Fulbright scholar, a teacher and artist at the East Siberian Academy of Culture. This morning, Naj sends this audio diary of his journey across Russia and his first encounter with Lake Baikal and its people.

Naj's audio diary was produced by Brian Mann with web production by Dale Hobson.  Go to full article

People: Alexei Boulokhov, Our Man in Cannes

A St. Lawrence University student begins his summer travels with an internship at the Cannes Film Festival. Alexei Boulokhov, who was born in Russia, also plans to spend the summer traveling through eastern Europe and visiting family in Russia before returning for his final year at St. Lawrence. He's been awarded a fellowship to work on a documentary video in Europe that will focus on gay teens. Todd Moe spoke with Alexei about his summer trek and the Cannes Film Festival.  Go to full article

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