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News stories tagged with "safe-act"

Gun rights advocates at a January rally in Morristown, NY. Photo: Zach Hirsch
Gun rights advocates at a January rally in Morristown, NY. Photo: Zach Hirsch

Trump rallies against Cuomo, New York gun control

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) Thousands of gun rights supporters have rallied at the state Capitol against gun control measures championed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

Celebrity businessman Donald Trump and Republican gubernatorial candidate Rob Astorino both addressed Tuesday's event at Empire State Plaza. The rally was in support of repealing a 2013 law that prohibited the sale of some popular guns like the AR-15.  Go to full article
Pro-gun protest outside gun show in Saratoga Springs, 1/12/2013. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/imaphotog/">imaphotog</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Pro-gun protest outside gun show in Saratoga Springs, 1/12/2013. Photo: imaphotog, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

NY SAFE Act ruling won't be the last word on gun control

On Tuesday, Federal Judge William Skretny in Buffalo ruled that most provisions of the NY SAFE Act were constitutional. Martha Foley and Brian Mann discuss how this effects the gun control-gun rights debate going forward into 2014.  Go to full article
Gun rights activist Richard Mack (L) and Clinton County Sheriff David Favro (R) hold a press conference in Plattsburgh, opposing the New York SAFE Act. Photo: Brian Mann
Gun rights activist Richard Mack (L) and Clinton County Sheriff David Favro (R) hold a press conference in Plattsburgh, opposing the New York SAFE Act. Photo: Brian Mann

Will upstate NY cops, sheriffs enforce gun control laws?

New York's tough gun law, known as the SAFE Act, was pushed through last January by Governor Andrew Cuomo, winning support from the Democratic Assembly and the Republican-controlled Senate.

Over the last six months, however, political opposition to the law has grown, especially in upstate counties where gun ownership is popular. A growing number of law enforcement officials, especially county sheriffs, now say they're deeply troubled by the law, which bans assault rifles and large ammunition clips. Some officers say they won't actively enforce the SAFE Act.  Go to full article
The state has established a toll-free tip line — 1-855-GUNSNYS (1-855-486-7697) to encourage residents to report illegal firearm possession. —DOCJS press release

Illegal guns tip line draws fire from legislators

UPDATE: Since broadcast of this story, NCPR has heard from Governor Cuomo's office, saying that the tipline was not created as a way to enforce the NY SAFE law. Here's a statement from Janine Kava, director of public information at the state Division of Criminal Justice Services:

"This program has been in place for more than a year and is aimed only at getting illegal crime guns off the streets: a goal that every New Yorker can agree with."

The New York State Association of Police Chiefs also sent NCPR a letter explaining why police started discussing the tipline this week: "On Tuesday, an e-mail was sent out by the New York State Association of Chiefs of Police to our membership statewide regarding the New York State Gun Tip Line."

The NYSAPC letter explains that law enforcement officials were first made aware of the tipline in Februrary 2012, and discussion of it was revived earlier this week, "The e-mail was the result of a series of ongoing meetings to deal with reducing guns used in crimes in New York State. It had nothing to do with the NY SAFE ACT. In our most recent meeting on Monday afternoon we talked about reviving this tip line and informing our members about it by sending out a message and scheduling a conference call to discuss it."

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Gun rights supporters, and some upstate New York lawmakers, are taking issue with an aspect of the new gun control laws, that rewards people for reporting illegal gun ownership to the state.  Go to full article
Robert Schulz from Queensbury announcing his lawsuit in Albany. Photo: Karen DeWitt
Robert Schulz from Queensbury announcing his lawsuit in Albany. Photo: Karen DeWitt

Are court challenges to NY's tough gun law DOA?

Conservative activists, legal experts and many Republican lawmakers are gearing up to try to roll back key provisions of the New York SAFE Act.

That's the tough gun control law pushed through in January by Governor Andrew Cuomo, following deadly shootings in Connecticut and western New York.

The NY SAFE Act phases in a total ban on assault rifles and large ammunition clips. It also establishes strict new rules for buying and selling guns in New York.

At least two court battles are brewing over the new law. But experts say overturning the measure through legal action will be a long-shot.  Go to full article

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