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News stories tagged with "safety"

Jerry Lottie demonstrates a response. Photo: Sarah Harris
Jerry Lottie demonstrates a response. Photo: Sarah Harris

SUNY Plattsburgh police train to respond to a shooter

In the wake of last month's shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, colleges and schools are re-thinking their security procedures. At SUNY Plattsburgh, officers are learning how to respond to a shooter.  Go to full article
Photo: USGS
Photo: USGS

U.S. and Canada collaborate on Seaway vessel checks

Huge freighters from all over the world ply the waters of the St. Lawrence River on their way to the Great Lakes. Some are new and high tech. Others are rusty and old. The vessels vary greatly in their safety measures and labor conditions.

The U.S. and Canada each inspect these ships individually, but now a new joint project aims to speed up the process and boost commerce in the region.  Go to full article
Critics say the Department of Labor "scrubbed" its website of documents about child safety on farms
Critics say the Department of Labor "scrubbed" its website of documents about child safety on farms

Critics say farm safety rules scrapped because of election year politics

The Obama administration has scrapped an effort to introduce new safety regulations designed to protect the tens of thousands of kids who work in agriculture.

Many farmers are applauding the decision to shelve the rules, calling it a victory for their rural way of life.

But safety experts say more teenagers under the age of 16 die each year working on farms than in all other industries combined.

With the presidential election just six months away, supporters and critics alike say the new rules were just too controversial. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article
Photo: NYS Dept. of Health
Photo: NYS Dept. of Health

Labor department scraps youth farmworker regs

The US Labor Department has scrapped safety regulations designed to protect teenagers working on farms.

North Country Congressman Bill Owens worked hard to pressure the Obama administration to withdraw the rules.  Go to full article
New York state Health Officials say this sileage defacer killed an 18-year-old farm worker in a work accident in 2005 (Photo:  NYS Department of Health)
New York state Health Officials say this sileage defacer killed an 18-year-old farm worker in a work accident in 2005 (Photo: NYS Department of Health)

War of words escalates over farm safety for kids

Farmers and members of Congress are pushing back hard against a plan by the Obama administration's to impose new safety rules on farms that employ children.

Critics say the proposed regulations would limit the ability of farm families to employ their own kids and could threaten a traditional way of life in rural America.

But supporters of the new rules say far too many teenagers are suffering serious injuries or dying on farms.

And they say many of the teenagers who work on farms in the US are hourly workers, with no family ties to the farmers who hire them.

As Brian Mann reports, this is a political fight that could reshape the way Americans think about farms and farm work.  Go to full article
Snow on Mount Baker. Photo of the Day archive: George Cook, Saranac Lake.
Snow on Mount Baker. Photo of the Day archive: George Cook, Saranac Lake.

New snow, new dangers in backcountry

After a mostly-mild winter, the Adirondacks now have a lot more snow; up to a few feet in the high peaks. That kind of weather can be dangerous. The state Department of Environmental Conservation yesterday put out a warning to visitors to prepare well for harsh and potentially "perilous" conditions in the backcountry.

The DEC advises people to dress in layers of fleece and wool, carry the right equipment, pack food and water, never travel alone and know the terrain. The warning comes after recent rescues and an avalanche on a new slide.

Adirondack Almanack founder John Warren brings us our Adirondack conditions report every Friday. Late yesterday, he told Nora Flaherty that snow has finally reached even the snow-drought areas of the mountains.  Go to full article
You have to take into account how extreme weather is handled by the community, not only at the government level, but also the citizens.

Bad weather boosts cities' "secure" rating

Three upstate New York cities rank in the top 20 most secure places to live in America.
Rochester, ranked second. Buffalo ranks as the 6th and the Albany metro area clocked in at 12th.
How did three snow-friendly upstate cities landed in the top 20? The challenging weather helped.  Go to full article
The police department is going to... have an extra presence indefinitely, until we feel we're back to normal.

Watertown police, schools trace gun threat

Watertown police continue to work with the Watertown City School District to find out who threatened to bring a gun to school earlier this week.  Go to full article
I frankly was surprised and disappointed at how easy it was.

Attorney General finds "blatant" violations at gun shows

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, says a statewide undercover operation found blatant and dangerous violations of the state law requiring background checks for gun-buyers. Karen DeWitt has more.  Go to full article
It applies, regardless of the cause of the flooding. ... from the larger perspective, this is what insurance is all about.

State: flood claim denials "incorrect"

The State Superintendent of Insurance is warning that insurance companies are telling some flood victims that damage from Hurricane Irene is not covered. As Karen DeWitt reports, he says that's just not correct.  Go to full article

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