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News stories tagged with "sailing"

Summer life aboard the 72-foot brigantine <i>St. Lawrence II</i>, a training vessel out of Kingston, Ontario.  Photo:  Brigantine, Inc.
Summer life aboard the 72-foot brigantine St. Lawrence II, a training vessel out of Kingston, Ontario. Photo: Brigantine, Inc.

How a tall ship can teach sailing and life skills

Since the early 1950s, the Kingston, Ontario-based St. Lawrence II has set sail on Lake Ontario and along the St. Lawrence River. The tall ship is a sail-training vessel for teens that will spend much of its time this summer as the star attraction in War of 1812 commemorations. It'll be in Cape Vincent as part of the annual French Festival next month.

Dave More is education director for Brigantine, Inc., the group out of Kingston that runs the summer sail-training program. He told Todd Moe that serving aboard the 72-foot brigantine St. Lawrence II is more than hoisting sails and swabbing decks. More says the program celebrated its 60th anniversary last summer.  Go to full article
Teacher and author Joy Forbes in her Montreal '76 Olympic jacket. Photo: Lucy Martin
Teacher and author Joy Forbes in her Montreal '76 Olympic jacket. Photo: Lucy Martin

An Ottawa teacher and author's memories of the Montreal '76 games

Athletes star at the Olympic Games; after years of training, it's their time to shine. But it also takes a small army of volunteers and workers to make each Olympics a reality. Thousands of behind-the-scenes participants come away with memorable experiences too.
Joy Forbes grew up in Quebec City and Montreal. She was a student at Queen's University in Kingston when the sailing events of the 1976 Montreal Summer Olympics were held in that lake-shore town. Forbes spoke German and Spanish, on top of French and English. So she had no trouble landing a job for those Games.

Forbes went on to a teaching career in Ottawa, with a strong interest in one room school houses. She was speaking about her book on that topic when Lucy Martin noticed Forbes was wearing a jacket inscribed with Montreal '76, and asked her about her own Olympic connection.  Go to full article
Captain Robin Walbridge, at the helm of the Bounty, while docked in Ogdensburg in 2010.  Photo:  Todd Moe
Captain Robin Walbridge, at the helm of the Bounty, while docked in Ogdensburg in 2010. Photo: Todd Moe

HMS Bounty captain, believed lost at sea, recalled sailing the St. Lawrence

The winds and waves of Hurricane Sandy this week took down an 18th century replica sailing ship used in three Hollywood films. On Monday, the Coast Guard rescued 14 of the HMS Bounty's crew off the coast of North Carolina. Claudene Christian, a crew member, was found unresponsive in the ocean off the North Carolina coast Monday evening. She was one of two crew members believed washed overboard when the Bounty began taking on water. Authorities say captain Robin Walbridge is still missing.

Walbridge had sailed the HMS Bounty all over the world, including the Galapagos, Holland, and British Columbia.

Two years ago, Walbridge and his crew docked the Bounty at Ogdensburg, while on their way to the Great Lakes United Tall Ships Challenge. Walbridge told Todd Moe that sailing the St. Lawrence was a favorite trip.  Go to full article
Jean Barberis and Ben Cohen test their paper skiff around the docks at the Antique Boat Museum in Clayton.
Jean Barberis and Ben Cohen test their paper skiff around the docks at the Antique Boat Museum in Clayton.

Down the St. Lawrence in a paper boat

Rowboats are a common sight on the St. Lawrence River, but a paper skiff is making its way through the Thousand Islands and down river to Montreal this week. The 17-foot boat was made by a group of New York City artists at the Antique Boat Museum in Clayton.

The urban artist/boat builders spent the last two weeks using the museum's collection and resources to build a new boat and learn more about the boating culture on the St. Lawrence. Their residency is a partnership with the museum's current exhibition of maritime-inspired art, called "Floating Through: Boats and Boating in Contemporary Art."

The artists are members of a Brooklyn collective called "Mare Liberum" and approach boat building in a non-traditional way: cheaply and quickly. With a little help from experts at the museum, they completed the boat in two weeks. But, a skiff made of paper? Could it really be rowed 168 miles past islands, through shipping channels and the St. Lawrence Seaway? Todd Moe stopped by the Antique Boat Museum late last week during the final stages of construction.  Go to full article
Andy Sajor out in the middle of Lake Champlain. Photos: Sarah Harris
Andy Sajor out in the middle of Lake Champlain. Photos: Sarah Harris

Winter sailors chase ice and wind on Lake Champlain

Imagine racing over a frozen lake on a wind-powered sled, hitting speeds that top 40 miles an hour. Ice sailing is a big sport in winter and the north end of Lake Champlain has a growing reputation as one of the best venues in the northeast. Our Champlain Valley correspondent Sarah Harris headed out on the ice to give it a try.  Go to full article

Sailing at CORK, in Kingston, Ontario

Kingston, Ontario has a number of claims to fame: a brief stint as a colonial capital, the home of prestigious universities, and a massive, limestone penitentiary that opened back in 1835.

Wind is another resource - one that brought windmills to near-by Wolfe Island in the last few years.

Each August, sailing enthusiasts from around the world come to Kingston for something called CORK: Canadian Olympic-training Regatta, Kingston. Top-level races that create lovely views of sails gliding back and forth across Lake Ontario.

Last year, Lucy Martin spent an overcast day at CORK and got a taste of what that's like, with or without wind.  Go to full article
Captain Robin Walbridge at the helm of the HMS Bounty
Captain Robin Walbridge at the helm of the HMS Bounty

HMS Bounty in Ogdensburg

The sailing ship used in three Hollywood films has dropped anchor in the North Country. The HMS Bounty is docked in Ogdensburg on the St. Lawrence River this weekend while on its way to the Great Lakes United Tall Ships Challenge. It was built in 1960 for the remake of the movie "Mutiny on the Bounty", starring Marlon Brando and was used more recently in one of the "Pirates of the Caribbean" films with Johnny Depp. Tours of the ship are available throughout the weekend. Todd Moe spoke with Captain Robin Walbridge on the main deck of the Bounty on a blustery afternoon. Walbridge says his 180-foot ship is a "good replica" of an 18th century British sailing ship, but larger than the original.  Go to full article
Capt. Dan Moreland at the helm of the <i>Picton Castle</i>.
Capt. Dan Moreland at the helm of the Picton Castle.

Pay tuition, sail a ship

The Picton Castle sets sail today down the St. Lawrence River, on its way to the Carribean Islands. It's a 100-foot tall ship retrofitted like a commercial sailing ship of the 19th century. And for a fee, you can ride aboard, as a member of the crew. The Picton Castle is a training ship, owned by a company in Nova Scotia. About 40 "trainees" will set sail this year. They'll help stand watch, and take workshops in seamanship, navigation, and the other arts of square-rig sailing. Gregory Warner stopped by the ship when it was docked in Kingston, Ontario. He met a former crew member, revisiting the ship after a long absence.  Go to full article

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