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News stories tagged with "sap"

Josh Parker stands next to his pellet-fired evaporator at his sugar shack near Canton. Photo: Todd Moe
Josh Parker stands next to his pellet-fired evaporator at his sugar shack near Canton. Photo: Todd Moe

Canton teen is young maple syrup entrepreneur

Joshua Parker doesn't have his driver's license yet, but he's a young maple syrup entrepreneur with big plans. At 16, he's one of the country's youngest maple producers.

Joshua catches rides with his dad and neighbors to check the taps in his sugar bush. And even though he relies on advice from more experienced maple producers, he's the boss and owner of Parker Maple Farm, near Canton. Five years ago, he started tapping sap with 10 buckets, as a hobby. Last year, he got serious and installed a tubing system with 3,500 taps. He created a business plan, borrowed money for state-of-the-art equipment (with help from his parents) and is waiting for the sap to start flowing.  Go to full article
Mike Farrell, director of Cornell's Uihlein Forest, in the sugar shack at the maple syrup research station near Lake Placid.   The evaporator is able to process about 25 gallons of syrup an hour.  Photo:  Todd Moe
Mike Farrell, director of Cornell's Uihlein Forest, in the sugar shack at the maple syrup research station near Lake Placid. The evaporator is able to process about 25 gallons of syrup an hour. Photo: Todd Moe

Why maple syrup matters: from tree to tap to market

With the start of the traditional maple sugaring season just weeks away, Todd Moe talks with Mike Farrell, director of Cornell's maple research field station near Lake Placid.

He's written a new book, The Sugarmaker's Companion, which explores tapping trees for sap, marketing maple syrup and the economics of sugaring.  Go to full article
How fluids move in plants.
How fluids move in plants.

Natural Selections: Plant blood

Do plants have blood? How does the human circulatory system compare to that of plants and trees? Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager tackle the question.  Go to full article
Brett McLeod over the evaporator
Brett McLeod over the evaporator

Neighbors gather for a warm-weather "boil"

The unusually warm weather this March hasn't been great for sugar makers. Maple syrup yields across northern New York and Vermont have been low, and a lot of producers are pulling their taps. But in spite of the strange temperatures, sugaring traditions remain alive and well. Sarah Harris went to an Adirondack "boil" and sent this audio postcard.  Go to full article

Sap Flows Above Average

The wild temperature fluctuations this winter have been good to New York's maple syrup producers. David Sommerstein reports the sap flow is already above average.  Go to full article

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