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News stories tagged with "saranac-lake"

Farmers, cooks, and food lovers will gather in Saranac Lake's Riverside Park on Saturday. Photo: Farm 2 Fork Festival
Farmers, cooks, and food lovers will gather in Saranac Lake's Riverside Park on Saturday. Photo: Farm 2 Fork Festival

All things local at "Farm 2 Fork" Festival in Saranac Lake

It's peak harvest season in the garden and Saranac Lake is celebrating fresh food and local farm abundance with its annual "Farm 2 Fork" Festival in Riverside Park this Saturday.

The event is a collaboration of the Adirondack Green Circle and the Ausable Valley Grange, with a mission to expand the support of local foods and local farms.

Todd Moe spoke with one of the organizers, Gail Brill, about what's new at the annual event. She says a bounty of locally produced food and drink is on the menu.  Go to full article
Tri-Town Packing co-owner Tom Liberty. Photo: David Sommerstein.
Tri-Town Packing co-owner Tom Liberty. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Local meat movement frets as Tri Town still in limbo

One of the North Country's few slaughterhouses and meat packing plants says it's trying to regain its certification for processing retail cuts of meat.

Tri Town Packing's co-owner Jeff Liberty says he is "working as diligently as possible" to resolve differences with federal meat inspectors. Liberty says he's hired a consultant from Iowa.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service says it withdrew its inspectors from Tri Town on July 17. A spokeswoman said by email that the USDA will continue to suspend inspection until it's confident Tri Town can "operate and produce product in a safe and wholesome way."

Tri Town is located in the northern St. Lawrence County town of Brasher Falls. It remains open for private meat orders, known as custom work.

But it's one of just four plants in the North Country that can prepare beef, pork, and lamb for sale in stores, restaurants, or at farmers markets. So farmers and businesses that rely on local meat sales are facing a shortage and looking for alternatives.  Go to full article
Saranac Lake, NY. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mytravelphotos/6919024628/">Jasperdo</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Saranac Lake, NY. Photo: Jasperdo, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Saranac Lake's drinking water cited for lead

SARANAC LAKE, N.Y. (AP) State health officials say an Adirondack village's drinking water has too much lead.

The Adirondack Daily Enterprise reports that the Department of Health sent a letter to Saranac Lake officials two weeks ago notifying them that the village is in violation for exceeding the allowable level for lead based on samples conducted earlier this year.  Go to full article
Diane Leifheit sketches Sarah Clarkin at Compass Printing in Saranac Lake. Photo:  Todd Moe
Diane Leifheit sketches Sarah Clarkin at Compass Printing in Saranac Lake. Photo: Todd Moe

Artist, easel, pastels and lots of faces in Saranac Lake

Adirondack artist Diane Leifheit is spending a lot of time this year getting to know her neighbors in Saranac Lake. She's been drawing their portraits and talking with local folks as part of her "Face to Face: Drawn to Saranac Lake" project.

Diane Leifheit usually likes to be outdoors, "plein air," but these days you'll find her with easel and pastel sticks at Compass Printing on Main Street in Saranac Lake -- her portrait studio for the project. That's where Todd Moe caught up with her as she waited for her next portrait "sitter." Leifheit told Todd that there's nothing as marvelous as the medium of pastel for painting on location.  Go to full article
"Mustard Field", Jacqueline Altman
"Mustard Field", Jacqueline Altman

Preview: "Mountains and Things" at the Adirondack Artists Guild in Saranac Lake

Adirondack artist Jacqueline Altman shares her love of watercolors and mountains in a new exhibit in Saranac Lake this month. The solo show, "Mountains and Things", continues through July 29. Todd Moe talks with her about favorite mountain views and spending a lot of time outdoors this summer with a paint brush, canvas and new tools.  Go to full article
"Resurrection", 91 x 70 inches, is among Tim Fortune's large watercolors on display through August 3rd at View in Old Forge.
"Resurrection", 91 x 70 inches, is among Tim Fortune's large watercolors on display through August 3rd at View in Old Forge.

Tim Fortune's very large watercolors on display in Old Forge

Some of Saranac Lake artist Tim Fortune's largest watercolors are on display at View in Old Forge. The show opens Saturday evening and includes wall-size paintings, some as tall as seven feet, that capture small moments on a grand scale. The 38 pieces in the exhibit include flowers, trees, rocks and water in the Adirondacks.

Todd Moe stopped by Tim Fortune's studio/gallery in Saranac Lake to talk about his love of watercolor and large format paintings.  Go to full article
"I like when I look in the mirror. I like who's looking back," says Kelly Metzgar. Photo: Zach Hirsch
"I like when I look in the mirror. I like who's looking back," says Kelly Metzgar. Photo: Zach Hirsch

For Kelly Metzgar, being a woman is a work in progress

As the New York legislative session came to an end, the LGBT community waited to see how lawmakers would handle the Gender Non-Discrimination Act, or GENDA, which would make it illegal to discriminate against transgendered people.

There are laws in New York State protecting people on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, race, and ethnicity, but not gender expression. For the seventh time, Republican leaders blocked GENDA from coming to the Senate floor for a vote.

"We're not asking for more rights. We're not asking for special rights. As I say in all my columns, we are only asking for equal rights, and equal protections as every other person enjoys," says Kelly Metzgar, an activist from Saranac Lake and a transgendered woman herself.

Kelly says she's been doing advocacy for a couple of years on the state, national, and even international levels - but she says the toughest battles have always been right at home: two divorces, depression, and hiding her true identity from her employer.

We first met Kelly last fall, not long after she first came out to her sister. Here's an update on her search for acceptance.  Go to full article

Saranac Lake cooking columnist publishes "eating local" cookbook

As a beginner at cooking locally and seasonally, I needed some expert advice on how to work with what you have and make the most of summer. Luckily, I was able to talk with Yvonna Fast last Thursday at Nature's Storehouse, where she was holding a book signing about her self-published cookbook, "Garden Gourmet: Fresh & Fabulous Meals from your North Country Garden, CSA, or Farmers' Market."  Go to full article
Burdette Parks as Rothko (right) and Tyler Nye as Ken, his assistant, in Pendragon Theatre's production of "Red".  Photo: Bonnie Brewer
Burdette Parks as Rothko (right) and Tyler Nye as Ken, his assistant, in Pendragon Theatre's production of "Red". Photo: Bonnie Brewer

Preview: "Red" at Pendragon Theatre in Saranac Lake

Pendragon Theatre has opened its summer season with the award-winning play "Red." The two character bio-drama, written by John Logan, is set in Mark Rothko's art studio in New York City in the late 1950s. Rothko was a well-known abstract expressionist known for images which featured large, and luminous color blocks. In the play, Rothko is painting a group of murals commissioned by an exclusive restaurant, and the story follows the initiation of Ken, a young assistant, into Rothko's world. Pendragon's production features a local cast, and is sponsored by the Adirondack Artists Guild.

Todd Moe spoke with director Kim Bouchard, who also teaches drama at SUNY Potsdam. Bouchard says she was intrigued by the script's intense dialogue between teacher and pupil, and its exploration of art, artists and generational clashes.  Go to full article
Student interns from Paul Smith's College and Middlebury College, with faculty from Paul Smith's College, Trudeau Institute and staff from the state Department of Health, conduct a tick collection orientation session. The session was a primer for a tick research and surveillance program planned for the Adirondacks this summer and fall. Photo by Jake Sporn
Student interns from Paul Smith's College and Middlebury College, with faculty from Paul Smith's College, Trudeau Institute and staff from the state Department of Health, conduct a tick collection orientation session. The session was a primer for a tick research and surveillance program planned for the Adirondacks this summer and fall. Photo by Jake Sporn

Trudeau Institute on the leading edge of Lyme disease research

The Adirondacks are expected to be New York's next battleground in the fight against Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases.

To gain a better understanding of how the disease will impact the park, researchers from Trudeau Institute in Saranac Lake are teaming up with the state Department of Health, Paul Smith's College and Adirondack Health on a tick monitoring project.

Those involved with the pilot project say it could be the first step toward making the Adirondacks, specifically Trudeau Institute, a center for research and public outreach into one of the fastest-growing infectious diseases in the country.  Go to full article

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