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News stories tagged with "save-the-river"

River users wait for water levels plan

Boaters, homeowners, and environmentalists along the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario are all anxiously awaiting September 17. That's the day the International Joint Commission announces a draft of a new system for controlling water levels in the Great Lakes. It'll be the first change since the 1960s and comes amidst exceptionally low water levels this summer. The new plan is the result of a five-year, $20 million public study. At a crowded meeting about water levels last weekend in Clayton, rumors circulated about a hybrid of three options made public last year. In today's report, we'll hear from a water levels advocate who fears the study won't turn out as he'd hoped. First, here's a part of David Sommerstein's report from last summer reviewing what this water level study is all about.  Go to full article

River advocates to push for cleaner ballast

The environmental group Save The River is kicking off a campaign to urge Seaway freighters to clean their ballast water this weekend in Alexandria Bay. At the group's annual "Winter Weekend," the new St. Lawrence Seaway chief is scheduled to make his first public appearance in the North Country. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Oil escaping the containment boom around the NEPCO barge.
Oil escaping the containment boom around the NEPCO barge.

The Slick of '76: Looking Back and Forward

This summer marks the 30th anniversary of the "Slick of '76", a 300,000 gallon oil spill in the heart of the Thousand Islands. Thick, gooey crude coated the shoreline from Alexandria Bay to Massena. The accident remains one of the largest inland oil spills in the United States. Many river residents still remember where they were on June 23, 1976. The event re-shaped the way a generation views its relationship to the river and the giant freighters that ply its waters. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Jay Nash
Jay Nash

Preview: 2nd Annual Rock for the River in Clayton

Musicians from around the country gather at the Clayton Opera House Saturday, 7/2, 8 pm for the 2nd annual Rock for the River benefit concert for the environmental group Save the River. It's the brainchild of Los Angeles singer/guitarist Jay Nash. Originally from Syracuse, Nash spent most summers playing guitar in the Thousand Islands and still considers it home. Nash told Todd Moe that after the inaugural Rock for the River concert, he and musician friend Joe Purdy spent last Labor Day weekend in a cottage in the middle of the St. Lawrence River writing and recording a cd: A Stream Up North.  Go to full article
Karen Lago on Cobb Shoal, where cattails dominate due to less water fluctuation.
Karen Lago on Cobb Shoal, where cattails dominate due to less water fluctuation.

People Plan for Future of Mighty River

The U.S. and Canadian governments are revisiting how they control water in the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario for the first time since the 1950s. The International Joint Commission has spent five years and $25 million studying how different water levels at different times of the year affect everything from wetlands and beaches to shoreline docks and Seaway ships. The IJC is shopping around three new water level plans at public meetings around the region. As David Sommerstein reports, most people in the North Country favor one of them, but their voices may be drowned out by larger population centers elsewhere.  Go to full article
Photo by David Doubilet for <i>National Geographic</i>
Photo by David Doubilet for National Geographic

Capturing the Underwater World on Film

David Doubilet documents the underwater world around the globe for National Geographic. He's a contributing photographer in residence with the magazine. His latest project on the Okavango River Delta in Botswana was featured in the December issue of National Geographic. Doubilet and his partner Jennifer Hayes will talk about their work and show photos at Save The River's Winter Weekend tomorrow at Bonnie Castle in Alexandria Bay. When not on assignment, Doubilet and Hayes live on the St. Lawrence River in Clayton. The infestation of zebra mussels in the St. Lawrence has made the water extremely clear, and it's a mixed blessing for Doubilet. On one hand, he calls it ecological devastation.  Go to full article

Corps Backs Off Seaway Expansion

A study of the St. Lawrence Seaway is pulling back from expanding locks and channels for bigger ships. Instead, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is going to research more about the Seaway's existing conditions, including environmental concerns. David Sommerstein has more.  Go to full article

Seaway Expansion: Spotlight on Canada

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers wants to move ahead on a 20 million dollar study of Seaway expansion. Shippers and ports say it's needed. Environmentalists say it could lead to dredging and blasting on the St. Lawrence River. The Corps is waiting on support and money from Canada. David Sommerstein surveys opinion north of the border.  Go to full article

Senator Clinton Voices Opposition to Expanding St. Lawrence River

Senator Hillary Clinton made her opposition to expanding the St. Lawrence Seaway channel plain Friday. Martha Foley talk with Save The River's Stephanie Weiss about the environmental group's fight to kill the expansion plan once and for all.  Go to full article

Alexandria Bay Hosts River Environment Conference

St. Lawrence River advocates gather in Alexandria Bay for "Winter Environmental Weekend 2002." The conference will address the health of the natural community and environment of the St. Lawrence River. Martha Foley talks with Save the River president John Farrell, a research associate at Syracuse University.  Go to full article

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