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News stories tagged with "sawmill"

John Martin in the main woodworking shop.
John Martin in the main woodworking shop.

How it works: a tour of the Croghan Island Mill

At one time, there were four mills located at the Croghan Dam, on each side of the Beaver River. John Martin is owner and operator of the last remaining, the Croghan Island Mill.

He specializes in custom windows and doors...things you can't get at Lowe's or Home Depot.
Up until the stop logs were removed from the dam, Martin's machinery was powered by water, which drove pulleys and belts in the historic mill. He's had to rely on electricty since then, but he's had to cut back.

Martin's glad the dam has been reclassified as a lower risk. "Hopefully we can go back to water power," he said, and "business will pick back up and I can get back to normal life again."
Martin gave David Sommerstein a tour of the mill a year ago.

Martin says his father bought the mill from Lehman & Zehr, the original owners, in 1969.  Go to full article

Croghan dam wins grant

State environment officials won't remove stop logs from the village of Croghan's historic dam - at least for now. As David Sommerstein reports, the delay comes as Croghan won a $100,000 grant to begin rebuilding the dam.  Go to full article
The Croghan Island Mill
The Croghan Island Mill

Crumbling dam threatens historic Croghan mill

Our series on New York's aging infrastructure continues this morning with a look at a crumbling dam in Lewis County and why it threatens a community's identity and culture.

There are more than 5,000 dams in New York State. They're mostly used for flood control, to provide drinking water, for hydropower, and to create lakes and ponds for recreation.

Even dam safety officials don't know how many need repair. But they do know 50 of the most potentially hazardous ones need to be fixed or dismantled.

One of those is on the Beaver River in the village of Croghan. If it can't be fixed, it may force the closure of one of the state's last water-powered sawmills. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Croghan Island Mill owner John Martin
Croghan Island Mill owner John Martin

Tour the Croghan Island Mill

David Sommerstein spent some more time with John Martin, the owner and operator of the Croghan Island Mill, and went on a tour. Martin specializes in custom windows and doors...things you can't get at Lowe's or Home Depot.

Martin says his father bought the mill from Lehman & Zehr, the original owners, in 1969.  Go to full article
Eldon Lindsay
Eldon Lindsay

All work and no play...

Eldon Lindsay farms about 500 acres not far from Canada's capital, Ottawa. Like most long-time farmers, he's part mechanic, part crop farmer, part herdsman. And now, part sawyer. He's breaking up his days with a new band saw mill, turning fallen trees and a few select picks into custom-cut lumber. Ottawa correspondent Lucy Martin followed a gravel road to a driveway marked by a mailbox, flag, flowers in full bloom, and a sign that reads "4-H Leader lives here." She sent this postcard.  Go to full article
Assemblyman Chris Ortloff and sawmill owner Pat Mitchell testify in Albany.  <br />Photo provided by Ortloff's office.
Assemblyman Chris Ortloff and sawmill owner Pat Mitchell testify in Albany.
Photo provided by Ortloff's office.

Sawmills ?Saved?: Rule Change Approved In Albany

State officials in Albany have agreed to allow the use of rough cut lumber in construction projects. Without the change to state building codes, made on Wednesday, hundreds of small sawmills in the North Country would have been forced to shut down. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article

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