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News stories tagged with "schools"

School cafeterias offer healthier menus

School is getting underway for the year, and cafeteria offerings around the country are getting an overhaul. The USDA has issued new national guidelines for the first time in 15 years. Schools are required to serve more whole grains, fresh fruits and vegetables, while limiting sodium and fat. Each meal needs to be in a specific calorie range. Breads need to be more than half whole grains.

Today is the first day of school at South Jefferson Central, and district food service director Cindy Overton tells Julie Grant the school is ready to go with the new menu.  Go to full article
Banford Elementary School in Canton. Photo: Canton Central School
Banford Elementary School in Canton. Photo: Canton Central School

Elementary schools grapple with more mandates, fewer teachers

It may be summer, but school officials are already preparing for fall. And they need to this year; North Country schools already know they have a lot of changes ahead. With state budget cuts and a new cap on property tax increases, Canton Central School is cutting staff and trimming programs. The elementary school is losing a teacher at each grade level. At the same time, it's implementing new teacher evaluations and moving toward national academic standards for students. Julie Grant reports.  Go to full article
I think you'll see closure of schools. I think you'll see mergers of schools.

Many NY schools expect to use up savings in next 18 months

A new survey shows that many New York school districts are within a year and a half of exhausting their fund balances. School business leaders say that could lead to district consolidationsor closures. Julie Grant reports.  Go to full article
Assemblywoman Addie Russell.
Assemblywoman Addie Russell.

Russell keeps pushing for school equity

New York State yesterday (Thursday) tried again t to dismiss a 2008 court case filed by small city school districts calling on the state to provide fair funding for all students, so they can receive a sound, basic education. The state made its case for the third time, appearing before the state Court of Appeals.

North Country Assemblywoman Addie Russell wants to legislate new Robin Hood-like standards for school aid distribution. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article
Patricia Downs displays her prize-winning dress made out of gum wrappers
Patricia Downs displays her prize-winning dress made out of gum wrappers

Plattsburgh school district exceeds tax cap, asks for taxpayer support

Schools around the North Country are trying figure out how to provide quality education in the midst of a historic budget squeeze. In Plattsburgh, school officials are asking taxpayers to do more to keep enrichment and arts programs alive. Sarah Harris has that story.  Go to full article
Canton Central School. Photo: Lizette Haenel
Canton Central School. Photo: Lizette Haenel

With the state budget settled, schools must decide their budget plans

Now that north country schools have final budget numbers from the state, it's time to figure out where to cut. Canton Central Superintendent Bill Gregory says they picked up an additional $172,000 dollars in state budget negotiations. But that only covers 10% of the district's $2.5 million shortfall.  Go to full article
Potsdam Central School
Potsdam Central School

North Country parents await state school aid budget

Many North Country parents, students, and school officials are anxiously awaiting agreement on the state budget. Canton Central held two public forums this month, to explain the district's $2.5 million budget shortfall, and hear where residents recommend cutbacks. The district is considering up to 40 job cuts.

Rachel Wallace is mother of two third-graders in the Potsdam Schools. She's worried that class sizes will get larger, and extra-curricular activities will be eliminated. Wallace says the drop in state school aid could have lasting impacts.  Go to full article
Amy Cotler
Amy Cotler

Creating healthier food cultures in schools, communities

Amy Cotler is an author, chef and local food advocate, who says it's an exciting time for the locavore movement, but more needs to be done. Cotler is author of the book, The Locavore Way, which focuses on the pleasures of locally grown food. On Monday, she'll give the keynote address at Dig In!, a food and gardening conference at Clarkson University in Potsdam. The event will bring together school staff, educators, parents, business owners, community leaders and health professionals.

Amy Cotler told Todd Moe that most schools, businesses and places of worship are doing a good job of developing and sustaining effective local food-based policies and practices, but, she says, they're just "scratching the surface".  Go to full article
Parents, teachers and taxpayers gather at the Ticonderoga High School gym. Photos: Brian Mann
Parents, teachers and taxpayers gather at the Ticonderoga High School gym. Photos: Brian Mann

Seeking a future for Ticonderoga's cherished public schools

North Country Public Radio has been checking in with schools around our region that are struggling with major budget shortfalls. Many districts have seen sharp declines in state aid over the last two years.

They also face rising costs for pensions and healthcare. And now they're also trying to live within the new two percent cap on property tax increases.

Around 200 people from various St. Lawrence County school districts gathered in Canton Central's high school auditorium last night to talk about how to bring about change in the way New York distributes state aid. The Watertown Daily Times reports some suggested filing a class-action lawsuit against the current formula.

Two busloads of students and adults are planning a bus trip to Albany to lobby lawmakers later this month.

Brian Mann was in Ticonderoga for a public meeting last night, where locals rolled up their sleeves and tried to sketch out a future for their public schools.  Go to full article
Keene Central School, Keene Valley, NY
Keene Central School, Keene Valley, NY

NYS School Board Association: Schools, tax cap on "collision course"

A study by the New York State School Boards Association finds three quarters of the state's school districts would have exceeded the new 2% property tax cap, had it been in effect for the current school year budget. The group predicts that the new tax cap and schools are "on a collision course." In Albany, Karen DeWitt has more.  Go to full article

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