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News stories tagged with "sea-lamprey"

Sea lamprey larvae that washed up on shore. The longer they are, the older they are. Inset: mouth of adult lamprey, courtesy US Fish and Wildlife Service. Photo: Sarah Harris
Sea lamprey larvae that washed up on shore. The longer they are, the older they are. Inset: mouth of adult lamprey, courtesy US Fish and Wildlife Service. Photo: Sarah Harris

Combating sea lamprey on Lake Champlain

If you're fishing for salmon or lake trout in Lake Champlain, you might end up with a fish you didn't bargain for. Sea lamprey are parasitic fish that look like eels. They latch on to larger fish and slowly drain out their body fluids.

Lamprey can decimate entire fish populations, so every four years the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, with help from the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department and New York's DEC, treats Lake Champlain tributaries with pesticides to control lamprey populations. This year's first treatment took place last week in the Saranac River delta in Plattsburgh.  Go to full article
Adult sea lamprey (Source:  NYS DEC)
Adult sea lamprey (Source: NYS DEC)

In Lake Champlain sea lamprey battle, the parasite is winning

Fishermen, environmentalists and government scientists met yesterday in Burlington to talk about the future of Lake Champlain. The lake faces huge environmental problems -- from an invasion of zebra mussels to agricultural pollution to a new wave of shoreline development. But all sides agree that Lake Champlain's number one enemy is the dreaded sea lamprey. The eel-like parasite has contributed to the rapid decline of trout and freshwater salmon that once drew fishermen from all over the world. As Brian Mann reports, state officials in New York and Vermont now say they need more help from the federal government.  Go to full article
Lester Graham
Lester Graham

GLRC: Top Ten Great Lakes Environmental Threats

Lester Graham is the executive editor of the Great Lakes Radio Consortium, and of the GLRC's series on environmental threats to the lakes. He told Martha Foley the consortium conducted a broad survey to compile the list.  Go to full article

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