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News stories tagged with "seaway50"

Marching bands energized the crowd in the rain Saturday.
Marching bands energized the crowd in the rain Saturday.

A rainy - and bittersweet - anniversary parade

Saturday's downpours cut short the St. Lawrence Seaway's 50th anniversary parade. Still, plenty of marching bands and floats did delight the crowd lining Main Street in downtown Massena before the rains came. Massena's been hit hard lately by plant shutdowns and layoffs at General Motors and Alcoa. But the pride of hosting one of America's engineering marvels was still on display. David Sommerstein sent this audio montage from the parade.  Go to full article
Tour participants watch a skit at the old train station
Tour participants watch a skit at the old train station

Seaway at 50: The living revisit the ghosts of the Lost Villages

On July 1st, 1958, the once wild waters of the St. Lawrence River began to rise up behind the massive Moses-Saunders hydropower dam. A year later, the river officially opened to international shipping as the St. Lawrence Seaway. We're recalling that 50th anniversary this week. But that day - now 51 years ago -- is known locally as Inundation Day. The rising water swallowed nine whole villages and hamlets on the Canadian side of the river, known today as the Lost Villages. 530 homes were moved or destroyed. 6500 people were forced to higher ground. You can still see roads that disappear into the river. Old foundations emerge when the water level drops. The memories of life before Inundation Day remain strong in today's towns on the northern banks of the St. Lawrence River. The Lost Villages Museum there brought the old days back to life recently with a Ghost Tour. As a part of our special coverage of the Seaway's 50th Anniversary, David Sommerstein went along and has our story.  Go to full article

Enviros set Seaway agenda for next 50 years

July will be a month of celebration and reflection as the St. Lawrence Seaway, and its locks, channels, and hydropower dam near Massena, turns 50. The waterway brought global trade to the St. Lawrence River, but also pollution, invasive species, and one catastrophic oil spill. More than 50 environmental groups across the region are releasing a seven-point agenda for a cleaner future for the Seaway. Jennifer Caddick directs one of those groups, Save the River, based in Clayton. She told David Sommerstein the 50th anniversary is bittersweet for residents of the Thousand Islands.  Go to full article
From left to right: Audrey Plourde, teacher Nancy Bogosian, Steffanie Premo, Ethan Tyo, Isaiah Perry, Mack Rogers.  (photo by Molly Gushea)<br />
From left to right: Audrey Plourde, teacher Nancy Bogosian, Steffanie Premo, Ethan Tyo, Isaiah Perry, Mack Rogers. (photo by Molly Gushea)

Seaway 50th: A plea for a royal visit, in vain

On June 26, 1959, Queen Elizabeth II of England and President Dwight Eisenhower boarded the royal yacht Brittania in Massena. They were the first to enter the locks on the St. Lawrence River and officially open the Seaway. This summer marks the 50th anniversary of that day. There'll be celebrations, also criticisms and moments of reflection, recognizing how the Seaway forever changed the face of the North Country. Some students at Massena's middle school were hoping for a repeat royal visit. In January, Nancy Bogosian's history class wrote letters to Queen Elizabeth urging her to return to Massena this summer. Here are some of those students reading excerpts from their letters.  Go to full article

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