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News stories tagged with "seaway"

NYPA Relicensing Yet to Address Local Concerns

NYPA needs to submit its relicensing application to federal officials in October, but local interests still haven't offered their input. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Breaking the Ice on the St. Lawrence Seaway

With so much snow still on the ground, spring can seem a long way off. But on the frigid St. Lawrence there is a sign of the warm days to come. Huge icebreakers are clearing a path for the international freighters that use the Seaway nine months of the year. After a long winter, the interior of North America will soon re-open to the Atlantic Ocean, and the rest of the world. David Sommerstein climbed aboard the Robinson Bay for one of the tugboat's first missions of the season--breaking ice in the canal between Eisenhower and Snell Locks near Massena.  Go to full article

NYPA Supports Excluding Lisbon From Power Project Boundaries

The new relicensing team for the New York Power Authority is making good on its promise to be more sensitive to the concerns of local communities. NYPA is asking the federal government for approval to drop the town of Lisbon from the St. Lawrence Power Project boundaries. David Sommerstein reports the new-found cooperation may have come from political pressure.  Go to full article

Corps to Study Navigation Improvements in Great Lakes

After a period of public comment, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is looking into navigational improvements for the entire Great Lakes system. The study could result in improvements to ports, docks, and shipping channels in the 5 lakes and along the St. Lawrence River. As David Sommerstein reports, it could also pose a threat to the marine ecosystem.  Go to full article

NYPA Speaks to Local Business Leaders

With the New York Power Authority and St. Lawrence County groups waging a public relations battle over the St. Lawrence power project relicensing deal, the county Chamber of Commerce is giving both sides a chance to sway local business leaders. At Clarkson University's Cheel Center yesterday, it was the Power Authority's turn to present its case. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

NYPA Relicensing, Part 3: The Future of Hydropower Relicensing

When the New York Power Authority began the process of relicensing its St. Lawrence power project for another 50 years of operation, it tried to be a good neighbor and invited all the stakeholders to get involved: environmentalists who wanted to improve fish habitat; boaters who wanted better docks; host communities that want compensation for their lands that were lost and flooded nearly fifty years ago. For many, relicensing has represented a once in a lifetime opportunity to right past wrongs. In the final part of David Sommerstein's series on relicensing the St. Lawrence-FDR Power Project, this cooperative approach is breaking new ground nationwide. If it works, it could set a new standard for hundreds of other relicensing efforts slated for the next ten years.  Go to full article

"Save The River" on Changes in St Lawrence Ecology

As David Sommerstein reports, John Farrell, president of Save the River, a citizen action group protecting the St. Lawrence, and a researcher at Syracuse University's College of Environmental Science and Forestry, talks about the effects the St. Lawrence Seaway and Power Project has had on shoreline ecology on the St. Lawrence.  Go to full article

NYPA Relicensing, Part 2: Taking a Risk

Drive along the St. Lawrence between Ogdensburg and Massena and you'll see a mosaic of public and private property. Beautiful riverside homes sit next to state picnic areas and town beaches. New York Power Authority marinas and recreation areas share the shoreline with Mohawk tribal lands. These diverse interests share one thing in common: the water in the wide St. Lawrence and 37 miles of its shoreline are used to make two million kilowatts of electricity at the St. Lawrence-FDR Power Project near Massena. Nearly fifty years ago, the project flooded thousands of acres of marshes, farms, businesses, and houses. A series of public meetings began almost five years ago to hear from stakeholders looking for compensation as the New York Power Authority seeks a license to operate the project for another 50 years. After all the bargaining, when the Power Authority released a draft of its application in January, some groups cried foul and accused the Power Authority of not negotiating in good faith. In part 2 of David Sommerstein's series on the relicensing, local groups are stepping up their struggle to get a settlement they can live with for half a century, but in doing so, they risk losing what they've already been offered.  Go to full article

History of the St. Lawrence Seaway Power Project

David Sommerstein spoke with St. Lawrence County historian Trent Trulock about the project.  Go to full article

NYPA Relicensing, Part 1: The Lay of the Land and Water

In 1954, over 6,000 workers and their families came to Massena from all over the country to work on the St. Lawrence. Their boss was New York's "Master Builder" Robert Moses. His goal was to harness the force of one of North America's greatest rivers, a main artery carrying the largest store of fresh water in the world to the Atlantic Ocean. The St. Lawrence Seaway and Power Project was the largest public works project in the world. The power project's 50 year operation license expires in 2003. In the intervening years since it went on-line, our values regarding public and private lands, the environment, and historical preservation have changed dramatically. The New York Power Authority faces challenges in getting a new license that Robert Moses would likely have considered trivial. Over the next three days, we'll look at the Power Authority's relicensing struggles. Today, David Sommerstein takes a trip deep into the inner workings of the Robert Moses Power Dam itself to see how it all works... and how it changed the river valley forever.  Go to full article

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