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News stories tagged with "seaway"

Critics Blast Seaway Study in Clayton

Last night in Clayton, more than 200 people had a clear message for the directors of a comprehensive study of the St. Lawrence Seaway system: don't dredge deeper and wider shipping channels in the St. Lawrence River -- ever. The Seaway links the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean, and it's almost 50 years old. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Transport Canada say their study only concerns how to maintain the existing locks and channels as they are, not how to expand them. But as David Sommerstein reports, Thousand Islands residents weren't convinced.  Go to full article

Clayton to Host Seaway Study Meeting

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is three years into a comprehensive look at the present and future of the massive St. Lawrence Seaway, a 45 year old engineering marvel. The process has been highly political. Some critics say it may pave the way for dredging and blasting a deeper channel in the St. Lawrence River. As David Sommerstein reports, the Army Corps is holding a series of public meetings, including one in Clayton, to address those concerns.  Go to full article
Seaway Administrator Albert Jacquez
Seaway Administrator Albert Jacquez

Rethinking the Underachieving Seaway

The St. Lawrence Seaway opened its 46th shipping season two weeks ago. It's trying to reverse a three year trend of declining cargo. Albert Jacquez is administrator for the St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation, the agency that runs the Seaway in the U.S. He attributes the decline to the overall economic slump and is hopeful about an economic recovery. But Jacquez admits the Seaway has never reached its expectations. Speaking with David Sommerstein in Massena, he says the Seaway needs to re-think itself.  Go to full article

Army Corps Takes More Heat

Environmental and budget watchdogs have launched an all-out offensive against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in a new report. They say the Corps wastes taxpayer money on unnecessary projects, including one along the St. Lawrence River. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Mohawks May Sue to Stop Icebreaking

The Akwesasne Mohawks are joining the chorus opposing a March 25th date to open the St. Lawrence Seaway. Mohawk territory straddles the St. Lawrence River and the international border. As David Sommerstein reports, all three tribal councils have threatened to sue if ice breaking begins there.  Go to full article
Administrator Jacquez
Administrator Jacquez

Seaway Defends March Opening

The St. Lawrence Seaway's top official in the United States went on the offensive last week about the waterway's opening date of March 25th. Seaway Administrator Albert Jacquez made a special trip to Massena from Washington, DC on Thursday. He spoke with David Sommerstein about criticisms that the date is too early to avoid environmental and safety concerns due to ice.  Go to full article

Seaway Opening Scrutinized, Again

The St. Lawrence Seaway is scheduled to open another shipping season on March 25th. Observers warn letting giant freighters into the St. Lawrence too early can damage riverside ecology and homes. They also worry about the nightmare scenario of an oil spill trapped under ice. As David Sommerstein reports, the Seaway has made compromises over how it chooses an opening date, but critics still fear economics trumps the environment.  Go to full article

Seaway Season Extended

A mild fall and early winter is leading officials on both sides of the St. Lawrence Seaway to give shippers an extra two days to transport goods in and out of the Great Lakes. As David Sommerstein reports, officials hope the extension makes up for a slight slowdown in cargo traffic from last year.  Go to full article

Seaway Study to Get More Funding

Congress is poised to earmark another $2 million to continue a study of shipping on the St. Lawrence River and the Great Lakes. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Report: Seaway Expansion Not Worth the Cost

Two environmental groups have released a study that questions the benefits of allowing bigger boats on the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway. Save the River and Great Lakes United paid for the report because they fear deepening the channels and allowing ocean-going vessels on the Great Lakes would harm the ecosystem. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Peter Payette reports.  Go to full article

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