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News stories tagged with "seaway"

Seaway Study to Get More Funding

Congress is poised to earmark another $2 million to continue a study of shipping on the St. Lawrence River and the Great Lakes. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Report: Seaway Expansion Not Worth the Cost

Two environmental groups have released a study that questions the benefits of allowing bigger boats on the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway. Save the River and Great Lakes United paid for the report because they fear deepening the channels and allowing ocean-going vessels on the Great Lakes would harm the ecosystem. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Peter Payette reports.  Go to full article

Study Challenges Seaway Expansion Benefits

Shippers and politicians in the Midwest say opening the St. Lawrence Seaway to so-called 'container' ships, which carry cargo boxes that fit on trucks and trains, would add billions of dollars to the Great Lakes economy. In the past, expansion critics have opposed digging a deeper and wider channel for bigger freighters largely on environmental grounds. Now they point to a new study that says many of the economic promises may be empty ones. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Corps Backs Off Seaway Expansion

A study of the St. Lawrence Seaway is pulling back from expanding locks and channels for bigger ships. Instead, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is going to research more about the Seaway's existing conditions, including environmental concerns. David Sommerstein has more.  Go to full article

Seaway Expansion: Spotlight on Canada

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers wants to move ahead on a 20 million dollar study of Seaway expansion. Shippers and ports say it's needed. Environmentalists say it could lead to dredging and blasting on the St. Lawrence River. The Corps is waiting on support and money from Canada. David Sommerstein surveys opinion north of the border.  Go to full article

Seaway Expansion: Canada's Role Uncertain

A Canadian environmental group doubts Canada will support an on-going study of expanding the St. Lawrence Seaway for bigger ships. But a Canadian port believes the opposite. David Sommerstein reports Canada's decision has been delayed for months.  Go to full article
David Sommerstein interviews port director Bill Payne.
David Sommerstein interviews port director Bill Payne.

On the Docks at the Port of Ogdensburg

Freighters on the St. Lawrence Seaway are making their last pick-ups and deliveries around the Great Lakes before they begin clearing the waterway for winter this week. The North Country's only shipping port, in Ogdensburg, receives an average of six ships a year. David Sommerstein visited the port while longshoremen were loading a Dutch freighter to see how life on the docks has changed over the years and what an expanded seaway would mean for the port.  Go to full article

Canada Wants Changes To Seaway Study?

David Sommerstein talks with John Birnbaum, executive director of the Georgian Bay Association in Ontario, who says he received assurances from Canada's Transport Minister David Collinette that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers study of the St. Lawrence seaway needs some changes to be acceptable to Canada.  Go to full article

Lockout Raises Shipping Profile For Seaway

Longshoremen on the West Coast returned to work last night after a ten day lockout left hundreds of ships waiting to unload cargo. The stoppage did not affect traffic on the St. Lawrence Seaway. But as David Sommerstein reports, it does highlight the role of shipping in international trade.  Go to full article

New York Leaders Oppose Seaway Expansion

This week two of New York's political leaders came out against expansion of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway system to accomodate bigger ships. They say it would be an environmental disaster for the St. Lawrence River and doesn't consider all the river's users. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

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