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News stories tagged with "seeds"

Seed packet for a disease-resistant variety of cucumber. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/20561948@N00/3472478600/">Cris</a>, Creative Commons, somew rights reserved
Seed packet for a disease-resistant variety of cucumber. Photo: Cris, Creative Commons, somew rights reserved

Disease resistant seeds? What's that?

It's a detail you don't want to miss, because planting "disease resistant" varieties of flower, fruits and vegetables could save a lot of heartache during the gardening season.

But, Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy says, "being disease resistant doesn't mean it's disease proof." That said, planting, say, squash that resists powdery mildew can be a real advantage. It isn't a cure, but it's a preventive step that can help produce a squash harvest rather than a squash failure.  Go to full article
Illustration from a 1904 Burpee seed catalog. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/burpee/167767777/">Burpee Gardens</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Illustration from a 1904 Burpee seed catalog. Photo: Burpee Gardens, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Tips for handling garden catalog-induced tempations

For most backyard gardeners it's still too early for serious seed shopping. But it doesn't hurt to look and plan. Just like weeds, those garden catalogs seem to multiply in the mail this time of year. They're fun to look at in mid-winter, but horticulturist Amy Ivy shares some advice on how to use those catalogs as tools for garden planning and landscaping ideas.  Go to full article
Photo: Lynn Karlin
Photo: Lynn Karlin

Starting seeds indoors: lots of options for onion lovers

Most gardeners probably started out growing onions from sets, which are small, immature onion bulbs. They're easy to grow that way. But horticulturist Amy Ivy says growing from seed lets gardeners pick varieties to suit their own needs or whims. Todd Moe spoke with Amy for some tips about growing onions from seeds, sets and seedlings.  Go to full article

Sorting through garden seeds

There's still snow on the ground in some parts of North Country, but seeds are on the store shelves. Todd Moe talks with horticulturist Amy Ivy about tips for what to look for.  Go to full article

Starting seeds, part 2

How to get a leg up on the growing season. Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy talks to Todd Moe about how to start seeds indoors and what might work best for your 2011 garden plan.  Go to full article

Shedding light on starting seeds indoors

Forget those freezing temperatures in the forecast for a few moments. Todd Moe and horticulturist Amy Ivy begin a series of conversations about starting seeds indoors. It's a sure sign of spring, right? Amy begins with tips for setting up up the proper lighting.  Go to full article

Garden chores move indoors

Cooperative extension horticulturist Amy Ivy joins Martha Foley each Monday for a gardening conversation. Today -- saving leftover seeds for next spring and proper care of amaryllis bulbs.  Go to full article

Little things to grow ? and eat ? in the dead of winter

Forty-one days till the official beginning of Spring, and weeks longer than the till the first greens from the garden. But there are things to grow and eat, right now, indoors. Martha Foley talks with Amy Ivy about sprouts and microgreens.  Go to full article

Seeds for the summer

It's late January and some gardeners are finding solace in shopping for seeds from catalogs or websites. Martha Foley talks with horticulturist Amy Ivy about what to order, what plants need to be started indoors and getting a head start on the gardening season.  Go to full article

Growing season slows

Martha Foley and horticulturist Amy Ivy talk about frost and share end of the season tips, including how to gather seeds for next year's garden.  Go to full article

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