Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "series"

The PSTD panel at the Different Drummer.
The PSTD panel at the Different Drummer.

PTSD at Ft. Drum, pt.3: A cafe for dissent

Since the war in Iraq began, the U.S. military has come under increasing fire for a mental health system that even top officials acknowledge needs a complete overhaul. Soldiers fighting combat trauma go untreated. Trained psychologists are in short supply. Funding for research into post-traumatic stress disorder is inadequate. Across the country, a growing number of soldiers are taking matters into their own hands. They're compiling lists of resources for people who need help. And they're organizing their own group therapy sessions. In part three of our series on PTSD, a café in Watertown has become a refuge for soldiers who are breaking rank and seeking help on their own. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

PTSD at Ft. Drum, pt.2: A soldier speaks out

If you hear one complaint from soldiers about how the Army handles post-traumatic stress disorder, it's about a bureaucracy that doesn't seem to care. The military officially recognized PTSD as a medical illness almost 30 years ago. Yet soldiers still complain of not getting the help they need. Mountains of paperwork, a backlog of claims, a shortage of licensed psychologists, and a dearth of scientific research all get in the way. In part two of our series on treating PTSD at Fort Drum, David Sommerstein has the story of one soldier who says Fort Drum's mental health system failed him again and again.

CORRECTION TO ORIGINAL STORY: This story first reported that the military requires three letters from commanders documenting that a soldier was in a traumatic combat situation. A Fort Drum spokesman e-mailed to say that one letter is required. The audio has been changed accordingly.  Go to full article

PTSD at Drum, pt.1: What the military does

Last month, 3500 soldiers returned to Fort Drum from a 15-month tour in Iraq. According to Army studies, a quarter of them, or almost one thousand men and women, will bring home mental problems associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. Their depression, anxiety, sleeplessness, and substance abuse, if not properly treated, can deeply scar themselves, their families, and the communities they live in. But study after study finds the military's mental health system in disarray: a backlog of PTSD-related claims, a shortage of licensed psychologists, a need for an overhaul of the entire system. Today we begin a 4-part series on post-traumatic stress disorder at Fort Drum. We'll hear from soldiers who feel they've been neglected, and we'll visit a café in Watertown that provides them refuge. But first, David Sommerstein reports on how Fort Drum identifies and treats soldiers for combat-related mental illness.  Go to full article
The Crystal is a familiar landmark on Watertown's Public Square
The Crystal is a familiar landmark on Watertown's Public Square

Very Special Place: Crystal Restaurant in Watertown

You've got to feel sorry for NCPR's Joel Hurd and TAUNY's Varick Chittenden. Our look at very special places has forced them to sample great diner food from Lloyds of Lowville, sweets from Freeman's Taffy Stand, ice cream from Donnelly's in Lake Clear, Michigans from Clare and Carl's in Plattsburgh, and cider and donuts from the Burrville Cider Mill. Hard work...but they've struggled through it. Well it turns out they've saved the toughest assignment for last. Last year, just before Christmas, they paid a visit to the Crystal Restaurant in Watertown to learn more about this North Country landmark and sample a holiday favorite, a tasty and potent creation called the "Tom and Jerry."  Go to full article
Fall view of the bridge taken by Photo of the Day contributor Patricia Lincourt, Wanakena.
Fall view of the bridge taken by Photo of the Day contributor Patricia Lincourt, Wanakena.

Very Special Place: Wanakena Foot Bridge

The largest suspension footbridge in the United States is located in a tiny Adirondack hamlet with just a half dozen year-round families. Located in southern St. Lawrence County, Wanakena is probably best known as the home of the New York State ranger School. But for many people it just isn't summer until they've walked the 171 feet from one end of the bridge to the other and dipped their toe in the Oswegatchie River. Today NCPR and TAUNY, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, continue our look at some very special places in the North Country. Varrick Chittenden made several trips to the footbridge this past summer and talked with folks who have a soft spot for the bridge and the town. Varrick and Joel Hurd recently talked about the bridge and its importance, past and present, in the northwestern Adirondacks.  Go to full article

Very Special Place: Burrville Cider Mill

There are few seasonal flavors that are as strong on the senses as apples and apple cider. For months and months we settle for fruit imported from who-knows-where, until late summer, when local apples are ready for picking and pressing. For many decades, people in Jefferson County have known that the first turning of the leaves means that Burrville Cider Mill is running at full capacity, producing some of the tastiest cider in the region. Today, NCPR and TAUNY, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, continue our look at some very special places in the North Country. A few weeks ago, Joel Hurd and Varick Chittenden visited Burrville to learn more about cider, donuts and why many people think this oldest building in the county is haunted.  Go to full article
Above: the restored marquis, below: Reg Clark with the restored Palace organ
Above: the restored marquis, below: Reg Clark with the restored Palace organ

Very Special Place: Palace Theatre

The old main street theatre marquee is a fading sight on the American landscape. Lake Placid not only has a beautifully restored marquee, but the inside of the theatre has been restored with the same care and attention to detail, thanks to its owner of 46 years, Reg Clark. Today, NCPR and TAUNY, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, continue our look at some very special places in the North Country. Varick Chittenden and Joel Hurd talk about the Palace Theatre in Lake Placid and learn more about its history and one-of -a-kind organ.  Go to full article

Very Special Place: Dick?s Country Store and Music Oasis

The northern edge of Franklin and Clinton Counties is a guitar fan's paradise. Not only is Malone home to one of the world's best-known inlay artists, Dave Nichols, but Orville Gibson, founder of the Gibson Guitar Company, was born in Chateauguay and is buried in Malone. And a few miles east of Chateauguay on a quiet stretch of Route 11, is a store that attracts guitar players, hunters and passers-by whose cars, and stomachs, are running on empty. Today, NCPR and TAUNY, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, continue our look at some very special places in the North Country. In the shadows of some newly-constructed wind turbines is Dick's Country Store and Music Oasis in Churubusco. Earlier this summer Varick Chittenden and Joel Hurd visited the store and learned why musicians and hunters travel hundreds and even thousands of miles to this North Country landmark.  Go to full article

Very Special Place: Clare & Carl's Hot Dog Stand

Many communities define themselves, at least somewhat, by their food traditions. Clinton County is no exception to this with it's take on the classic american chili dog called the Michigan. Today NCPR and TAUNY, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, continue our look at very special places in the North Country. While michigans are easy to find in and around Plattsburgh, many of the original establishments that have served michigans since the 1940s have gone away. But one place, Clare and Carls, is still going strong, selling hundreds of hot dogs a day for the few months it's open each year. Joel Hurd and Varick Chittenden visited the restaurant to find out why it's so popular.  Go to full article

Very Special Place: Lloyd's of Lowville

The classic American diner is such a revered symbol that it's common to see new restaurants designed to look like old diners. But the personal service, fair prices, great desserts and relaxed, friendly atmosphere usually let you know that you're in a diner that's been around a while, and is an important part of the community. Today NCPR and TAUNY, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, continue our look at some very special places in the North Country. Joel Hurd and Varick Chittenden visited Lloyd's of Lowville earlier this year to find out why it's such an important part of Lewis County's largest town.  Go to full article

« first  « previous 10  11-30 of 92  next 10 »  last »