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News stories tagged with "shipping"

New Lock for Great Lakes Shipping?

Port directors are trying to gather support for a new large lock built at Sault Saint Marie, Michigan. They say without the improvement, ports on Lakes Michigan and Superior will lose the ability to be major players in shipping. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Mike Simonson reports.  Go to full article

Seaway Study to Get More Funding

Congress is poised to earmark another $2 million to continue a study of shipping on the St. Lawrence River and the Great Lakes. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Coast Guard Preparing Ballast Standard

The U.S. Coast Guard is working to develop a new standard for cargo ships to help stop the spread of aquatic invasive species. Officials are holding five public meetings to discuss the environmental impact of such a standard. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Mark Brush reports.  Go to full article

Report: Seaway Expansion Not Worth the Cost

Two environmental groups have released a study that questions the benefits of allowing bigger boats on the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway. Save the River and Great Lakes United paid for the report because they fear deepening the channels and allowing ocean-going vessels on the Great Lakes would harm the ecosystem. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Peter Payette reports.  Go to full article

Cargo Ships Oppose Proposed Ballast Rules

A proposed bill requiring ocean-going foreign vessels to dump their ballast water before they enter the Great Lakes is receiving strong criticism from shipping groups. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Tracy Samilton reports.  Go to full article

Corps Backs Off Seaway Expansion

A study of the St. Lawrence Seaway is pulling back from expanding locks and channels for bigger ships. Instead, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is going to research more about the Seaway's existing conditions, including environmental concerns. David Sommerstein has more.  Go to full article

Seaway Expansion: Spotlight on Canada

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers wants to move ahead on a 20 million dollar study of Seaway expansion. Shippers and ports say it's needed. Environmentalists say it could lead to dredging and blasting on the St. Lawrence River. The Corps is waiting on support and money from Canada. David Sommerstein surveys opinion north of the border.  Go to full article

Seaway Expansion: Canada's Role Uncertain

A Canadian environmental group doubts Canada will support an on-going study of expanding the St. Lawrence Seaway for bigger ships. But a Canadian port believes the opposite. David Sommerstein reports Canada's decision has been delayed for months.  Go to full article
David Sommerstein interviews port director Bill Payne.
David Sommerstein interviews port director Bill Payne.

On the Docks at the Port of Ogdensburg

Freighters on the St. Lawrence Seaway are making their last pick-ups and deliveries around the Great Lakes before they begin clearing the waterway for winter this week. The North Country's only shipping port, in Ogdensburg, receives an average of six ships a year. David Sommerstein visited the port while longshoremen were loading a Dutch freighter to see how life on the docks has changed over the years and what an expanded seaway would mean for the port.  Go to full article

Canada Wants Changes To Seaway Study?

David Sommerstein talks with John Birnbaum, executive director of the Georgian Bay Association in Ontario, who says he received assurances from Canada's Transport Minister David Collinette that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers study of the St. Lawrence seaway needs some changes to be acceptable to Canada.  Go to full article

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