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News stories tagged with "shipping"

Tug boat <i>Salvor</i> & barge
Tug boat Salvor & barge

Seaway Barge Hits Shoal, Leaks Salt

Shipping on the St. Lawrence Seaway reopened at 6:20pm yesterday as officials work to remove a grounded tanker barge from the river near Alexandria Bay. The barge was carrying liquid calcium chloride, a kind of salt. Some 12,000 gallons of the chemical escaped into the river before the leak was stopped. As David Sommerstein reports, Vicki Garcia of the St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation says the Canadian owned tug boat Salvor was pushing the barge downriver early yesterday morning when the tug's steering malfunctioned.  Go to full article

Great Lakes States Support Ballast Water Lawsuit

A lawsuit brought by several environmental groups in California seeks to increase protection against invasive species. The groups hope to force the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate ballast water discharge. Now, officials from the eight Great Lakes states are writing-in to support these groups in their lawsuit. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Celeste Headlee reports.  Go to full article

Seaway, Alcoa Show Economic Growth

Two traditional industries in the North Country are sharing in the rebounding economy. The St. Lawrence Seaway posted a 12% boost in traffic in its first few months of the season. And Alcoa released a positive quarterly earnings report last week. But as David Sommerstein reports, it's unclear how the good economic news will affect the region.  Go to full article

Clayton to Host Seaway Study Meeting

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is three years into a comprehensive look at the present and future of the massive St. Lawrence Seaway, a 45 year old engineering marvel. The process has been highly political. Some critics say it may pave the way for dredging and blasting a deeper channel in the St. Lawrence River. As David Sommerstein reports, the Army Corps is holding a series of public meetings, including one in Clayton, to address those concerns.  Go to full article

Mohawks May Sue to Stop Icebreaking

The Akwesasne Mohawks are joining the chorus opposing a March 25th date to open the St. Lawrence Seaway. Mohawk territory straddles the St. Lawrence River and the international border. As David Sommerstein reports, all three tribal councils have threatened to sue if ice breaking begins there.  Go to full article
Administrator Jacquez
Administrator Jacquez

Seaway Defends March Opening

The St. Lawrence Seaway's top official in the United States went on the offensive last week about the waterway's opening date of March 25th. Seaway Administrator Albert Jacquez made a special trip to Massena from Washington, DC on Thursday. He spoke with David Sommerstein about criticisms that the date is too early to avoid environmental and safety concerns due to ice.  Go to full article

International Treaty to Combat Invasive Species?

Cargo ships bring goods that we buy, but they also bring invasive critters in their ballast water. These invaders compete with native species and upset the natural balance. Now, delegates from around the world have drawn up a plan to help stop the spread of these foreign stowaways. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Mark Brush has more.  Go to full article

Clinton Urges Bush to Abandon Seaway Study

In a last ditch effort, Senator Hillary Clinton is calling on President Bush to abandon a study that critics say could lead to a costly and environmentally harmful expansion of the St. Lawrence Seaway. In a recent letter, Clinton urged President Bush not to request funding for the Great Lakes navigation system review in his upcoming 2005 budget, Clinton says the study itself will cost taxpayers millions of dollars and untold damage to the seaway.  Go to full article

Seaway Season Extended

A mild fall and early winter is leading officials on both sides of the St. Lawrence Seaway to give shippers an extra two days to transport goods in and out of the Great Lakes. As David Sommerstein reports, officials hope the extension makes up for a slight slowdown in cargo traffic from last year.  Go to full article

New Lock for Great Lakes Shipping?

Port directors are trying to gather support for a new large lock built at Sault Saint Marie, Michigan. They say without the improvement, ports on Lakes Michigan and Superior will lose the ability to be major players in shipping. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Mike Simonson reports.  Go to full article

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