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News stories tagged with "shoreline-development"

Governor Cuomo unveils details of Onondaga Lake Revitalization Program. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/governorandrewcuomo/12210211353/">Office of Gov. Cuomo</a>
Governor Cuomo unveils details of Onondaga Lake Revitalization Program. Photo: Office of Gov. Cuomo

Cuomo outlines Onondaga Lakefront revitalization project

SOLVAY, N.Y. (AP) Gov. Andrew Cuomo says the state will invest $30 million in a $100.3 million economic development and revitalization project along Onondaga Lake.

Cuomo says Wednesday that the project includes $50 million for a performing arts center, $20 million for infrastructure improvements including wastewater treatment upgrades and nearly $19 million for housing, roads and businesses.  Go to full article
Local residents, including Lindy Ellis, right, and Ginger Dora, center, listen to a presentation Wednesday night during a public hearing in the Harrietstown Town Hall in Saranac Lake on a proposed 90-room Lake Flower hotel. Photo: Chris Knight, courtesy <em>Adirondack Daily Enterprise</em>
Local residents, including Lindy Ellis, right, and Ginger Dora, center, listen to a presentation Wednesday night during a public hearing in the Harrietstown Town Hall in Saranac Lake on a proposed 90-room Lake Flower hotel. Photo: Chris Knight, courtesy Adirondack Daily Enterprise

Saranac Lake residents weigh in Lake Flower hotel project

The first in a series of public hearings on a major hotel project proposed in Saranac Lake was held Wednesday night in the village. Lake Flower Lodging LLC wants to build a four-story, 80,000-square foot upscale resort hotel on the site of three small motels on Lake Flower.

The project recently won $2 million in state economic development funding. However, local residents have raised concerns about the height of the building along the village's picturesque shoreline.  Go to full article

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The larger of the Grimditch family's two Lake Placid boathouses. Photo: CHris Morris, courtesy <em>Adirondack Daily Enterprise</em>
The larger of the Grimditch family's two Lake Placid boathouses. Photo: CHris Morris, courtesy Adirondack Daily Enterprise

Boathouse case may go to highest NY court

A groundbreaking legal case about which government can regulate boathouses isn't over yet. The Grimditch family of Lake Placid hopes the state's highest court will review a June 28 appellate court decision that ruled the town of North Elba does have jurisdiction over boathouses on Lake Placid.

Previously, an Essex County judge had sided with the Grimditches, saying only the state can regulate boathouses because they're on navigable waterways, not on land.  Go to full article

North Country Dam Agency Draws Audit Rebuke

The state comptroller is slamming the Hudson River Black River Regulating District for mismanagement and possible corruption. The District manages dams and waterways stretch from the Fulton Chain and Indian Lake to the Hudson River and Great Sacandaga Lake. As Brian Mann reports, an audit issued yesterday found that the agency lacked proper checks and balances for its six-million dollar budget.  Go to full article

APA Cuts Violation Caseload, Drawing Praise and Concern

Over the last two years, the Adirondack Park Agency has worked to pare down a backlog of more than three thousand old enforcement cases. These are alleged violations of the Park's strict zoning and environmental laws. The APA now says ninety percent of those cases have been closed. But some critics worry that the Agency still lacks the staff and the legal clout needed to enforce its own rules. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
From "The Privately Owned Adirondacks"
From "The Privately Owned Adirondacks"

The Privately Owned Adirondacks Caps a Writing Career

For more than thirty years, Barbara McMartin has been one of the Adirondack Park's leading thinkers and conservationists. Though often controversial, McMartin is more than a gadfly. Her books on the policy and history of the region have influenced a generation of politicians and activists. Until recently, she chaired the state's Forest Preserve Advisory committee. Her popular guidebooks have led hikers and paddlers into the remotest corners of the mountains. McMartin's latest book - which she describes as her last - details the complex history of private land ownership in the Park. The Privately Owned Adirondacks was written while she struggled with cancer. Brian Mann visited Barbara McMartin recently at her home in Canada Lake, to her talk about the book, her life and the future of the Adirondack Park.

NOTE: McMartin is scheduled to speak about her book Monday evening, July 27, 2004, at the Adirondack Museum in Blue Mountain Lake.  Go to full article

Cedarlands Conservation Deal Near Long Lake Draws Praise, Raises Eyebrows

Conservation groups in the Adirondacks are praising a deal that will protect more than four thousand acres of forest and shoreline near Long Lake. But the project also allows a prominent environmentalist to buy a 60-acre piece of shoreline property. As Brian Mann reports, a plan to build a private home on the parcel has drawn sharp criticism:  Go to full article

Settlement Clears Way for Lake George Shoreline Development

Developers in Lake George will build fifty-five new timeshare condominiums on the lakeshore. The move follows an out-of-court settlement, reached with the Lake George Association--a non-profit group that had fought to block the plan. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Shoreline Development Boom Within the Adirondack Park Prompts Zoning Debates

One of the great myths of the Adirondack Park is that state zoning regulations restrict or at least shape most development on private land. In fact, much of the real estate boom of the last decade has taken place on shorelines. Thousands of homes have been built in lakefront areas that are largely exempt from Park Agency control. As Brian Mann reports, critics of the zoning plan say the result has been a disaster for lakes and ponds in the Adirondacks.  Go to full article

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