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News stories tagged with "six-moments-in-the-history-of-an-urban-forest"

Joanna Dean and Will Knight with a cross-section of a 154-year-old bur oak, cut to permit denser development despite protests from area residents.
Joanna Dean and Will Knight with a cross-section of a 154-year-old bur oak, cut to permit denser development despite protests from area residents.

Ottawa exhibit considers the "Urban Forest"

One city's relationship with trees is explored in a new museum exhibit in Ottawa.

Six moments in the history of an urban forest is the brainchild of Carleton University history professor Joanna Dean and graduate student Will Knight.

Present-day Ottawa began as rough riverside lumber shanties in the early 1800s. It grew to become the nation's capital, with various trends in tree clearing and tree planting along the way. More recently, the area has faced damage from natural disaster and invasive pests, like the emerald ash borer, which threatens perhaps 30% of Ottawa's existing tree population.

Although the display considers urban forestry from an Ottawa perspective, the challenge of combining trees with cities is universal. Lucy Martin spoke with co-curators, Joanna Dean and Will Knight on opening day at the Bytown Museum, beside the treed slopes of Parliament Hill.  Go to full article

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